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AMPLIFIERS, AMP ACCESSORIES and CABS (SEE BOTTOM OF PAGE FOR SPEAKERS, ACCESSORIES, TUBES, ETC.)

 

ATTENUATORS:  

A Big thanks to UPS!:  Check out the latest damaged amp courtesy of  the UPS gorillas.  This was a wonderful-sounding Premier B-160 Club Bass, an especially good sounding Blues amp for guitar.  Original ’65 Jensen C15N is totaled beyond repair, speaker baffle is in many parts.  It was wrapped in 3 layers of the large bubble wrap inside a triple-wall box.  Think they would pay off on insurance?  Think again.  I insure everything I ship for full value, however, I do that only in the event of loss or in the event of obvious carrier damage such as tire tracks across the box.  I took care of my customer - but unfortunately nobody will take care of me.  If this happens to you, the only tip I can give you is they will pay off if:  (1) you spend many hours on the phone and impress upon them that you’re not going to go away; (2) you send them a letter on a lawyer’s letterhead threatening legal action and  reminding them that it’s illegal to receive payment for insurance and not pay off when there is a claim.  

RARE, BOUTIQUE, VINTAGE, COLLECTABLE

  1. 1997 Budda Stringmaster 30W 4X10 Combo, (hand-wired circuit), (front panel), (back), (top), (back panel), (chassis), (acc.).  I have a good selection of early hand-wired Budda's in stock including a Verbmaster 18 4X10 combo, rare 6L6-powered 30W Verbmaster 2X12 combo, early hand-wired Superdrive I 30W head with 2X12 cab from 2000, and now this very rare Stringmaster.  I am fairly certain that this is the first Stringmaster I've ever had.  This one is serial SMC-0038, the 38th built, which is written on the back of the chassis. You'll notice some other writing there, under the footswitch inputs, "Jeff Bober 2010", which Jeff wrote when he gave this amp a full tune up less than 2 years ago.  A little history on these great amps:  Back in the day Jeff Bober had a small company that did repairs and mods, and in the mid-90's started building his own killer little amps called Budda, all hand-wired and built in small numbers.  His first model, the Twinmaster Ten, a screaming little 18-watter, is credited with starting the low power craze.  Players realized that a low power amp running wide open, has much better tone than a 50W model turned down.  Jeff eventually sold his company, but stayed on at the Maryland factory, building both his original designs plus the new "Superdrive" series, which were great amps but not hand-wired.  The hand-wired series, which offered little profit margin, soon fell victim to corporate thinking and were discontinued.  The Stringmaster was a fairly complex amp for Budda, which made its name with just 3 knobs and no frills.  The Stringmaster was a true 2-channel amp, a first for Budda, with a volume control for the clean channel, plus volume and level for the high gain channel, with 2 boost positions for even higher gain.  The two channels shared Bass and Treble controls, as well as a front panel Effects Mix knob, which makes a lot more sense than putting it in the customary spot next to the effects loop on the back panel.  Tube complement includes 4 EL-84s, 3 12AX7s, and a 5U4 rectifier tube.  The back panel features 2 effects loops, an active loop with separate send and return level controls, as well as a passive loop, as well as a Slave output with its own level control.   It also features main and aux speaker outputs, and here's the great part, which are *footswitchable* via the 3-button footswitch.  If you want a 2X10 open back and a 1X12 closed back, you can switch cabs while you're playing to select your choice of cabinets.  Both speaker outputs have switches to choose 4-8-16 ohms.  This normal channel has sufficient headroom to get a loud clean tone, but it's still very expressive and responds to touch very well.  The Hi-Gain channel breaks up much earlier and although it doesn't go into Boogie territory, has more than enough gain for most players. It's a very sweet distortion which will lend itself to most playing styles.  I always warn customers about the power of Budda amps:  their 18W sound like most 40-50 watters; their 30W sound like a 75-100 watts.   It's a quality made amp, very neat inside with a lightweight birch cabinet.  Cosmetically it's in beautiful shape for 15 years; tolex, front/back panel, grill, are all in clean shape. Worst flaw is one of the chassis screws in the top is non-original.  Budda hand-wired amps were always fairly pricey and this model sold for around $1800 in the late 90's.  For many players, this will be the ultimate in combo amps and a very nice price for an amp of this quality at $1299.  Includes manual, footswitch, and footswitch cable.  

  2. Budda Verbmaster 30 2X12 Combo, (panel), (top), (back), (tubes), (footswitch/manual), (chassis).  Rare 30W model with 6L6 power!  Serial number VG3-018, this is one of the early 30-watters from Jeff Bober and Budda.  Before he sold Budda, Jeff had a small company that did some of my repairs and built some killer little amps called Budda, all hand-wired and built in small numbers.  After gaining a reputation as the amp guru of the Baltimore area, doing Marshall mods and various repairs and hot-rodding, his extensive knowledge went into designing some of the best boutique amps ever made.  After Jeff sold his company, he stayed on at the Maryland factory, aka "Budda East", building both his original designs plus the new "Superdrive" series, which initially were still hand-wired.   The hand-wired series, which offered little profit margin, soon fell victim to corporate thinking and was discontinued in favor of the "Superdrive II", which were strictly circuit board designs.  The 30-watt Verbmaster was one of Jeff's hand-wired prior to the sale (this one's a 2001 model).  Most of these featured a quad of EL84's but a few, like this one, were built with a pair of 6L6's.  This amp delivers complex tone characteristics, rich in harmonic structure and organic in nature.  The tone can be described as a cross between a Deluxe and an AC30, with the aggressive attack of a Plexi.  It's a fairly complex amp for Budda, which generally featured 3 knobs and no frills, not even an fx loop.  The Verbmaster features an excellent sounding reverb with two distinct sounds, "sand" and "surf"; Hi-gain and Normal inputs, each voiced differently; and the usual bass - treble - volume controls.  The high-gain input adds a tube stage to overdrive the normal input's gain stage, which in turn drives the unique tone-control stack.  The back panel features an effects loop; slave output with level control; parallel speaker outs with a 4/8/16 ohm switch.  Tubes are a pair of Russian EH 6L6's power tubes, Russian Sovtek 5AR4 rectifier, with two 12AX7s, a 12AT7, and 12AU7 in the preamp/reverb.  The dual reverb circuit features a darker sound with high-end roll off in the "Sand" setting, with "Surf" being a more over the top brighter tone.  This amp breaks up very early and isn't recommended for anyone looking for clean headroom - but for a non-master volume high-gain amp, you get a beautiful tube breakup at a relatively low volume.  For many players, this will be the perfect amp for larger clubs.  In typical Budda fashion there's nothing conservative about the wattage rating.  This amp will stand up against many other tube amps rated at 50 watts or more.  Here's a sample of the versatility of the smaller 18W Verbmaster (1X12), using only a guitar's volume control (no effects were used), click here for a YouTube demo.  Budda is know as much for their touch sensitivity and players who appreciate this characteristic will especially love this amp.  OEM speakers are made by Eminence for Budda and sound very good.  Budda hand-wired amps remain some of the best values on the market, and one of the few that weren't clones of Fender or Marshall.  I read where Budda is starting up their hand-wired series again, including a Verbmaster.  I don't have any reports on them yet but I can't imagine sounding any better than this original model, built by the master himself.  A killer amp for $1499.  

  3. Budda Superdrive 18 1x12 Combo, (panel), (top), (back), (back panel), (acc.).  Of all the Budda's I've had, this is the first Superdrive Series II ever.  All I can say is it's a great amp, with tone that's on par with the earlier hand-wired Series I and while there's a certain elitist appeal to a hand-wired amp, tonally, circuit boards seem to sound just as good.  Budda has specialized in club amps going back to Jeff Bober's first hand-wired amps such as the Twinmaster and Verbmaster, both of which were dual EL84 powered with a 5U4 rectifier and a trio of preamp tubes.  The Superdrive shares a lot in common with these early amps, but they've been re-engineered to be more versatile, with the ability to play harder-edged music, when desired.  It's one of the best amps for getting a quality tone with preamp distortion, but when you crank up the master this baby really delivers.  At 18 watts it's a perfect club amp.  Features of the Superdrive 18 combo are:  18 Watt Class A/B with dual EL84 power; 5U4 Tube Rectifier; three 12AX7 Preamp Tubes; Treble, Mid, and Bass Controls; Rhythm Volume; Master Volume; Pull Bright on Rhythm Volume; Drive Control; 2 Channels - Rhythm and Hi Gain; Effects Loop; Slave Out; Pull/Modern Mid Function; Custom Wound Transformer with 4-8-16 Ohm Switch; and Custom Designed Budda Phat 12 Speaker. For full specs visit Budda here and click here for a bunch of YouTube demo's.  This model achieved a commendable 9.6 in tone and 9.6 overall in Harmony-Central reviews (link).  While these may be circuit board amps, so are 98% of the amps sold in America and unlike most of the competition, these amps weren't built on the cheap and they feature a thick circuit board with top notch components all around.  A few rubs on the tolex covering but overall this amp is in nice shape and sounds absolutely perfect.  This is the first Budda I've been able to put out at under a grand and for $879(Hold-Greg C 11/21/12), it's hard to beat.  Includes footswitch, original manual, and paperwork.  

  4. Budda Verbmaster 18 4X10 Combo, (panel), (top), (back), (back panel), (footswitch), (chassis).  90's model - Serial VMD-0003, the 3rd Verbmaster built!  Back in the day Jeff Bober had a small company that did some of my repairs and built some killer little amps called Budda, all hand-wired and built in small numbers.  After gaining a reputation as the amp guru of the Baltimore area, doing Marshall mods and various repairs and hot-rodding, his extensive knowledge went into designing some of the best boutique amps ever made.  Jeff eventually sold his company, but stayed on at the Maryland factory, building both his original designs plus the new "Superdrive" series, which were great amps but not hand-wired.  The hand-wired series, which offered little profit margin, soon fell victim to corporate thinking and was discontinued.  They came out with a 10th Anniversary hand-wired but at $5K list, the amp was essentially a Twinmaster with a commemorative badge.  The Verbmaster was a fairly complex amp for Budda, with more than 3 knobs and an effects loop.  The Verbmaster features an excellent sounding reverb with two distinct sounds, "sand" and "surf"; Hi-gain and Normal inputs, each voiced differently; and the usual bass - treble - volume controls.  The high-gain input adds a tube stage to overdrive the normal input's gain stage, which in turn drives the unique tone-control stack.  The back panel features an effects loop; slave output with level control; parallel speaker outs with a 4/8 ohm switch.  This amp breaks up very early and isn't recommended for anyone looking for clean headroom - but for a non-master volume high-gain amp, you get a beautiful tube breakup at a relatively low volume.  For many players, this will be the perfect club or practice amp.  Although 18 watts may seem rather tame, this is a deceptively loud amp.  For a good example of the versatility of the Verbmaster (1X12), using only a guitar's volume control (no effects were used), click here for a YouTube demo.  Other than the Anniversary model, which is great but overpriced, Budda hand-wired amps remain some of the best values on the market, and one of the few that weren't clones of Fender or Marshall.  Dealer cost on these was over $1500 on my last price list that had the hand-wired and it's an excellent amp, in nice shape, for $1399.  See lower down on this page for the same era handwired Budda Twinmaster Ten.  

  5. Dr. Z Mazerati GT Head, (front panel), (top), (back).  Who does't love Dr Z's, the ultimate in simplicity and pure tone that's characterized by their smooth overdrive, tight bass, and quiet operation, even at full volume.  One of the main characteristics of the GT, even more than other Dr Z's, is it's interaction with a guitar's volume control.  Crank up the amp and go from full tube saturation to clean and articulate by rolling back your volume.  Guys like Brad Paisley, who could easily opt for any type of high tech gain device, rely on this simple method of voicing their amp.  The distortion never gets muddy or too fuzzy, just a very fat, with plenty of harmonics.  From what I understand, this newer GT model is a major revamp of the original Mazerati, which was essentially a Ghia with double the output (4 EL84's instead of the Ghia's two).  The GT is voiced for much more gain, providing more of the singing quality players love about Z's.  Players compare the tone to Trainwrecks so it isn't surprising that the GT uses the time tested output transformer designed for us by Trainwreck's own Ken Fischer.  Cranky out 38 watts, the GT utilizes two 12AX7s, a quad of EL84s, and a 5AR4 rectifier.  The GT is cathode biased so output tube changes are a breeze.  With just a volume and tone you won't get lost in a futile attempt to dial in a perfect tone.  Perfect tone is its preset.  There are outputs for 4/8/16 ohms so it's compatible with any cab you want to use.  Also, this one is a 10th anniversary model, with a commemorative badge on the top.  Here's  a good thread on The Gear Page (link) devoted to the GT and YouTube demo's here and a list here.  If you're looking for incredible amounts of touch dynamics, in the highest gain amp Dr. Z has ever produced, this amp's for you.  New price was $1649 but this one's mint and just $1149.  

  6. Dr. Z Galaxie 1X12 Combo, (top), (panel), (back), (spkr/tubes), (footswitch).   After years of primarily EL84 powered amps (and a few 6V6), Dr. Z has produced their first ever 6L6 powered amp.  In addition to a pair of 6L6', the Galaxie has three 12AX7's in the preamp and a 5U4 tube rectifier.  It also features a Triad output transformer, which is original spec for Fender's classic tweed amps including the low-powered Twin, Super, and Pro, which is part of the magic of this fine amp.  The Galaxie is a dual-channel amp, with channel 1 voiced for clean tones; channel 2 is the overdrive/dirty channel.  Channel 1 is the perfect clean with crisp highs, fat lows, and a very throaty voice overall.  Channel 2 is the OD channel with excellent sustain with a beautiful break-up.  CH-2 reaches full volume at around 9'oclock and from there on it's more of a gain knob, with more overdrive, sustain, and compression as you turn it up.  Both channels share the same EQ (bass/treb/pres) knobs.  The tone knobs are very interactive with the volume controls and really act like gain controls as much as EQ knobs.  Turn up the bass or treble and you'll notice an increase in gain at the same time.  The tonal possibilities aren't as simple as the layout appears but there really isn't a bad sound on this amp, regardless of settings.  Rather than the vintage style separate inputs for the two channels, the Galaxie uses a footswitch to change channels, which is a nice touch for live bands, with an indicator light to let you know when you're on CH-2.  Output is rated at 30 or 40 watts, selectable via the pentode/triode switch on the back panel.  This features wasn't really to offer an appreciable difference in output rather than different voicings.  Although it has a very slightly higher output, the 40W setting is a bit tighter and slightly more high fi sounding; while the 30W setting gives the amp and earlier breakup.  For more info go to Dr. Z here.  There are a number of good demo's on YouTube including this one by Frankie Starr, playing what appears to be an earlier version with a different layout.   The Galaxie 1X12 sells new for $1849, which is right in the ballpark for a hand-wired 40W combo.  This one is dead mint and a killer combo for $1299.   

  7. Dr. Z KT-45 Head and Z-Best 2X12 Theile Cabinet, (Head - Panel - Top - Back - Tube chart), (Cab - Top - Back).  It's hard to believe that Dr. Z amps have only been around a little over a decade.  While most companies are still struggling for name recognition at 10 years, Dr. Z. is a widely-known and have distinguished themselves among the top of the hand-built amp market, largely due to top players like Brad Paisley being loyal users.  Although casual fans know Brad as a singer/songwriter, he's also the hottest Tele player on the scene today (according to me) and could easily make it as a first-call session musician.  His unmistakable tone is due in large part to Dr. Z.  To paraphrase Z's site, if you want to know about the sound of the KT-45, just listen to The Who's "Live at the Leeds" album.  The KT-45 is a completely original design with the basis of this amp's design being the EF-86 preamp tube front-end and Tone Stack also used on the Z28 and Route 66 models.  The unique timbre of the EF-86, along with gain that's 50% higher than the hottest 12AX7, virtually inhales the tone straight through your guitar cord. The KT-45's tone stack allows control of the gain in three separate parameters- gain and amount of distortion in the treble registers, clear to swelling bass in the lower registers, and overall volume and drive. This allows you to dial in a Thick Top End, with a clean punching bass, or a swelling bottom end with crystalline highs. This is all done with plenty of clean to satisfy a Country picker, enough crunch for Rock & Roll, and tough singing sustain for British R&B. Tube complement includes the EF86, a 12AX7, and a pair of EL34 cranking out 45 watts.  With just three knobs there isn't a lot of superfluous junk sucking tone out of the signal but just as the one-knob Mini-Z (below) isn't a one-trick pony, with these 3 knobs you can coax a lot of tones from this baby.  With outputs for 4/8/16 ohms you can run virtually any cabinet but you'll be hard-pressed to find one better than this "Z-Best" 2X12, loaded with a Celestion Vintage 30 and a G12H30, a popular and great sounding combination.  The unique thing about the Theile design which allows design to compliment the full frequency range of your guitar.  Low end is determined by the port thickness, Mid response by the shelf depth, and Top end by choice of speakers. Placed vertically, the Z Best delivers a tuned focused sound, yet with the airy qualities associated with open back cabs. When placed horizontally, you pick a bit more low end as the port is then coupled with the floor.  This is a long throw cabinet that will get the sound to the back of the room.  With the head selling for $1699 and the cab $779, this setup will run you $2478 new.  Better still, consider this mint used set up for less than the cost of just a head alone. Just $1679 takes both pieces. (HOLD-Nic A3/16)

  8.  Dr. Z Galaxie Head and 4X10 Cabinet, (Head - Panel - Top - Back - Cover), (Cab - Top - Back).  After years of EL84 or 6V6 powered amps, Dr. Z has produced their first ever 6L6 models.  In addition to a pair of 6L6', the Galaxie has three 12AX7's in the preamp and a 5U4 tube rectifier.  It also features a Triad output transformer, which is original spec for Fender's classic tweed amps including the low-powered Twin, Super, and Pro, which is part of the magic of this fine amp.  The Galaxie is a dual-channel amp, with channel 1 voiced for clean tones; channel 2 is the overdrive/dirty channel.  Channel 1 is the perfect clean with crisp highs, fat lows, and a very throaty voice overall.  Channel 2 is the OD channel with excellent sustain with a beautiful break-up.  CH-2 reaches full volume at around 9'oclock and from there on it's more of a gain knob, with more overdrive, sustain, and compression as you turn it up.  Both channels share the same EQ (bass/treb/pres) knobs.  The tone knobs are very interactive with the volume controls and really act like gain controls as much as EQ knobs.  Turn up the bass or treble and you'll notice an increase in gain at the same time.  The tonal possibilities aren't as simple as the layout appears but there really isn't a bad sound on this amp, regardless of settings.  Rather than the vintage style separate inputs for the two channels, the Galaxie uses a footswitch to change channels, which is a nice touch for live bands, with an indicator light to let you know when you're on CH-2.  Output is rated at 30 or 40 watts, selectable via the pentode/triode switch on the back panel.  This features wasn't really to offer an appreciable difference in output rather than different voicings.  Although it has a very slightly higher output, the 40W setting is a bit tighter and slightly more high fi sounding; while the 30W setting gives the amp an earlier breakup.  There are a number of good demo's on YouTube including this one by Frankie Starr.  For more info go to Dr. Z here.  For a companion piece, the Dr. Z 4X10 cab with the Galaxie nails the tweed Bassman tone to a tee.  The 4X10 is an open-back, loaded with proprietary "Z 10” speakers, that utilizes the classic floating baffle design found on the great 4x10 amps of the 1950’s. The entire front of the cabinet comes alive to deliver an outstanding wall of sound.  Rated at 4 ohms, it works great with the Galaxie head or any amp you want to put on top of it.  With the head selling for $1649 and the cab $679, this setup will run you $2328 new.  Better still, consider this mint used set up for less than the cost of just a head alone. Just $1629 takes both pieces.  Includes a quality padded case for the head

  9. Dr. Z Mini-Z 1X10 Combo, (back).  Fantastic little 5-watter, all tube, handwired, made for the player who wants one thing - high gain, power tube distortion at a studio/bedroom volume.  Very few of these in circulation.  Be forewarned, this is a loud little bugger, but much more manageable than an 18-watter.  Clean headroom?  Basically there isn't any to speak of and Dr. Z recommends turning back your guitar's volume control to clean it up.  It's really designed to start breaking up almost right away, at around 9 o'clock, crunch sets in at 10-11 o'clock, sustaining lead tone straight up 12, ZZ top tone around 2 o'clock, and just crank it all the way for full blown saturation.  The amp gets both louder AND more distorted as you turn it up.  Features include just a volume knob...that's it....no line outs, headphone out, or anything else to complicate the circuit.  It runs an EL84 power tube and 12AX7 preamp tube run through a Weber C8R ceramic 8" speaker, with the same quality construction and perfect fit/finish as Z's high-end amps.  It sounds equally at home with humbuckers or single coils and a great choice for anyone looking for a 5-watter with a lot of tonal variety in the volume control.  Click here for Dr. Z's site with some great video demo's at the bottom of the page.   Dr. Z now makes this as a 1X10 combo, and added a built-in attenuator.  I'm not sure how much attenuation a 5W amp needs but I guess it comes in handy in a small home when everyone is asleep.  The new 1X10 sells new for $949; this earlier model is immaculate and a great little amp for just $599.  

  10. 2004 Eden CXC112 Time Traveler with WT330 Head, (panel), (top), (back), (back panel), (stock pic).  Eden makes some of the best bass amplification around, falling between the mid-line SWR and high-end Aguilar gear.  The choice of many studio pro's and top touring acts, they make great touring amps, over 1000W, in various enclosures, all the way down to some small practice amps in their Nemesis series.  The CXC112 is a lower powered amp compared to their World Tour series, but it doesn't scrimp on features.  One of the cool things I like about this amp is the cabinet design.  At around 30"X15"X14", it has a narrow design, but tall enough that you don't have to bend down to adjust the controls. It's perfectly tuned and the design makes the low end sound absolutely huge.  With a 12" LF driver and a horn, crossed-over at 4K ohms,  it's got plenty of thump, while retaining the high end clarity.  Frequency response is 42Hz to 20KHz, which handles the lower notes of a 5/6 string with ease.  It's characterized as a warm, throaty mid-bass with good low end and a mellow upper register.   A few of the features of the WT330 head, World Tour series, include 3-band EQ with the mids switchable from 550Hz to 2.2KHz, dbx-style compression, optically coupled dynamic booster system for bass and treble, an assortment of patch points, balanced DI output.  The compressor on this amp is really impressive, and you can use it to smooth out the overall tone, or completely squish the sound, nearly down to zero output if turned all the way up, plus it's much more quiet than most comp's. The Enhancer adds sparkle to your tone and will make it stand out in the mix; I would never turn it off completely.  They Dynamic Boost switches add a new twist and with the Bass switch engaged you get thundering lows that shake the windows, even at lower volume.  On the back panel you have speaker outs - choice of Neutrik or 1/4" pair; effects loops; tuner out that can act as an extra instrument send if desired; stereo Aux in/out; balanced recording out with XLR jack and level control plus ground lift switch.  The cabinet is carpet covered with heavy duty side handles, a fan located on the side, and plastic corners.  Although Eden says they would prefer a 4 or 8 ohm load, they also state that you can safely run the WT330 head down to 2 ohms.  RMS output at 2 ohms is 420 watts; 330 at 4 ohms; or 200 at 8 ohms, as is the rating of the CXC112 cabinet.  It's Plenty of power for club gigs or if you need more, just add another cab and jack it up to 330.  One of the cool things about this set up is that the WT330 can be removed and used with other cabinets, or by itself if you're using it for a studio gig.  The amp is in clean shape while the cabinet is in normal used condition with some carpet wear and two of the plastic corners are missing a small corner piece.  Performance is perfect, pots have been cleaned and it sounds fantastic.  If you're looking for a fairly compact amp that's equally at home in the club or studio, this set-up is hard to beat for $579, $100's less than the new cost on the head alone.    

  11. Fargen Olde 800 - JCM800 Clone, (panel), (top), (back), (spkr/label), (cover).  For anyone who lusts after the Marshall 2204 tone, that's what this amp does, only better.  I've probably had 100 JCM800s over the years, including a dozen or more 2204's.  This amp would rank above the best of the lot.  Fargen are top-notch boutique amps, hand-wired, using only the best components, including Mercury Magnetics transformers.  I wouldn't recommend this amp to a country player, jazzer, or someone in a Top-40 band.  It was designed to be exclusively a rock/blues monster.  One look at the brass panel and you'll note the standard layout of a 2204:  Drive (preamp), Master, Treble, Bass, Mid, Presence, with a single input and an output of 50 watts through a pair of EL34 power tubes, with three 12AX7's (one is a phase inverter), and a solid state rectifier.  Compared to a well-tuned 2204, the Olde 800 sounds thicker, less harsh, and has more gain, which comes in handy when you use your guitar's volume control to switch between a cleaner tone and overdrive.  During my test drive I was impressed by its seeming endless sustain, and singing harmonics on nearly every note I hit.  Ben at Fargen has since come out with a MK II model, which adds a Decade switch for 60's/70's/80's, but I honestly don't know how this amp could be improved and it seems superfluous to add anything to it.  Speaker is a Rola Celestion G12-65 and it has outputs for 4-8-16 ohms you can use any virtually any speaker or external cabinet.   It's a nice grab and go size, 20X17X10, and with a solid pine cabinet it weighs in at around 35 lbs.  Click here for a good review on an original Olde 800 combo from UltimateGuitar.  I don't know if Ben is doing the combo's in this model any longer, but they're running $1700, for the head alone.  This amp appears to have seen very limited use and is pretty much flawless, finished in a vintage looking 2-tone brown and cream, and a slamming deal on an ultimate 2204, for just $1299.  Includes free aftermarket custom cover. 

  12. 1994 Fenton Basic 110 Combo, (panel), (back), (label/spkr), (circuit), (tubes).  Extremely rare amp--only 25 built during the entire brie run--designed and built by Precision Audio Tailoring (aka Jeff Bober of Budda Amps fame, and now East Amps), partnering with a Maryland retail store.  Jeff was the first builder I was aware of who departed from the 50W/100W amp model, opting for lower power and making the power tubes a more integral part of the tone.  A year after this amp was built Jeff started Budda, with his Twinmaster Ten, based on this Fenton model.  It's completely handwired, using an EL84 duet in the power section, 2X12AX7's in the preamp, with a 5Y3 rectifier.  Power and preamp tubes are all USA JAN/Philips.  This amp is very unique in that there's basically zero headroom.  It starts to break up around half-way to 1 and by "1" it has a beautiful singing sustain that increases, along with the volume, until around 4, and from 4-10 it doesn't get much louder, only more saturated.  For players looking for a beautiful singing overdrive, it simply can't be beat in a small combo.  Nearly everywhere on the fretboard hits a harmonic for infinite sustain.  I upload a pretty bad YouTube clip (link), done without any preparation, grabbing the closest guitar which was a Pine Island guitar with GFS humbuckers.  You'll note the early breakup, harmonic overtones, and clarity across all notes even with heavy overdrive.  I should note that the 2nd input does have a little more headroom but don't buy the amp for that. Buy this if you want a beautiful overdrive not possible by any pedal.  One other thing:  this amp is loud, along the lines of an early Twinmaster.  While it sounds great through this 1X10 open back, I would love to hear it through an extension cab.  For a hand-wired amp of this pedigree, a nice buy at $899(HOLD-Phil H 2/10).  (Note: I was informed by the original owner of this amp that only 25 Fenton amps were built).

  13. 1965 Fender Princeton, (top), (panel), (back), (chassis).   Great sounding Model AA964, 45-year-old Princeton in nice vintage condition.  When I got this from an employee at a major boutique amp company they had switched it over to 6L6 power but I took it to our tech, had it returned to 6V6, rebiased, and tremolo gone over.  It now has that classic Princeton tone with nearly all clean headroom (breakup doesn't start until 9-10) and a very strong tremolo circuit.  Tube complement includes a pair of Mesa 6V6's for power, GZ34 rectifier, and a pair of 12AX7's in the preamp.  At about 12 watts these are very popular studio amps, and I've heard some club gigs with a Princeton on a barstool and mic'd through the house system.  It sounded great.  Everything sounds perfect - it's quiet at idle when turned up all the way, bass and treble knobs are strong as is the Vibrato speed and intensity.  Two minor mods include Vibrato jack has been changed from RCA to 1/4" and speaker changed to a Mojotone 10" - plus power cable has been changed to a long 3-prong type for safety.    It's in very clean shape as these go and would make a wonderful addition to your collection, or a nice studio/practice amp.  Selling for $879 with the Mojo, or if you want a more vintage sound, we can replace with a proper 8 ohm 1972 Fender/CTS 10" (pic) for $950.  

  14. Fender 5E3 Tweed Deluxe Clone by Mission Amps, (panel), (top), (back), (tubes), (aging).  Unlike the Marshall below, this Deluxe has loads of clean headroom before breaking into a lovely singing sustain overdrive.  This amp is an excellent alternative to players who want the 50's tweed Fender tone, except in a more reliable amp...at a fraction of the price.  This amp uses excellent components, very well made pine cabinets with perfectly applied tweed, and a circuit that's very true to the original.  You'll notice nice touches like Hovland and Orange Drop caps, Tung Sol power tubes, and a high end Jensen C12N, itself an $85 part.  This is an excellent studio amp with loads of clean headroom, up to 5-6, which is quite loud at that setting.  At around 6 you start to get a beautiful power tube saturation that sings and gets some lovely harmonic overtones.  It doesn't get a lot louder as you turn it up, only more overdriven, which is what I want in a tube amp.  With a pair of 6V6's cranking out around 20 watts, this amp is sufficient to work nearly any club stage.  The original owner did a lacquer job which overall was well done, other than one side was a little uneven and had the looks of a typical water-stained old tweed.  I took this as a hint to age the edges and corners so now the amp looks more like the real thing.  For more details, check out Mission Amps here, with the complete combo on the left side of the page.  The base price on this kit is $729, not including upgrades found on this amp, nor a few hundred for the tech to build it up.  I have info on the tech, who is somewhat of a legend in his part of the world.  The build is first-rate in all regards.  This is one fine sounding 5E3 for $679(HOLD-Brad T). 

  15. THD 2x12 Ported Extension Cabinet, (back), (top), (spkrs/jack), (Bonus! D2F Cover).  The perfect mate for my THD Bi-Valve or Uni-Valve, available on my amps page.  THD's 2X12 is a ported cab in a bass-reflex design with a slot-port in the rear instead of the more common tube port in the front.  The advantage is no "whistling" which can occur with a tube-port, and the slot port gives a lot of rear projection and a more open, 3-D sound similar to an open back cab, with a dramatically fuller, tighter bottom end.  Constructed from 3/4" 9-ply birch with 1/2" birch ply baffle and rear panels; corners are finger jointed for strength and rigidity; speaker baffle is dadoed into the sides for maximum strength and durability.  To eliminate noise found in other handles, THD uses steel inset handles that are remarkably strong and do not rattle.  Switchcraft jacks are use to provide a better connection to the speaker plug and steel jack dishes because they cannot break or push through.   Speakers are wired with top quality Belden wire that lasts a lifetime. Also featured on the cabinet's exterior are nickel-plated steel corners to deflect blows and large cast rubber feet that serve to reduce vibrations.  Rated at 160W, with a pair of custom designed THD "Vintage" and "Longhorn" speakers (info here) which have been modeled after the older Celestion Classic Lead 80 and Brown-Frame Oxford 12.  Both speakers are factory aged to prevent that new speaker harshness.  This cab was designed to rival a 4x12 in volume, power, and projection, providing a tight, clean, focused sound that's not the least bit harsh, brash, or tubby.  Imagine getting the sound of a 4X12 but only having to load-in something 1/2 the size.  New, these sold for $720 - $790 with the custom fit D2F padded cover.  This cab is in brand new condition, and with the cover, is a smoking deal at $550(HOLD-Hank H 3/26).  Better yet, buy the cabinet and a head, and get free shipping.  

  16. THD Hot Plate 2 Ohms Attenuator, (pic2).  A "must have" for a Bassman if you want any break up due to the massive clean headroom the amp has and you really have to drive it to painfully loud levels for power tube saturation.  This model is made for 2 Ohm load and works best for amps rated at 2 ohms such as the Fender 4X10 Bassman.  Offers Bright and Deep switches for tailoring your sound - Bright switch gives you two different high frequency levels to compensate for an overly bright, or dull speaker cabinet while the Deep switch offers two distinct bass settings to help you fill out the bottom end, or reduce the bass in a cabinet with too much low end.  Has built in noise reduction up to 10dB, line out, and a fan to keep it cool.  Brand new condition with original box and manual.  With new ones going for $329, a sweet deal for $229, or $199 with the Bassman above, and if you buy it with the Bassman, I'll include  two custom made cables to connect to the 4 output jacks of the Bassman.  For full specs click here for THD's site.

  17. 1969 Fender Princeton Amp, (panel), (top), (back), (label/speaker).  Highly regarded AA964 model, this 43-year old Princeton in beautiful vintage condition and sounds like a Princeton should.  Dating Fenders during this era isn't precise, but the AA964 circuit was used from '64 to '70 (AB1270 from '71 onwards) so the lack of a chrome drip edge makes it a '69//'70.  Since the transformers are dated mid-'69, I'll call it a '69.  At about 12 watts these are very popular studio amps but you can also place it on a bar stool and mic it through the house PA, and you've got a great club amp.  The AA964 is an all-tube circuit with three 12AX7's in the preamp, dual 6V6 power, and a GZ34 rectifier.  If you're looking for more of the Fender clean tone, the Princeton has more of it than the Princeton Reverb and it stays clean until around 7-8, where it goes into a very smooth overdrive.  Everything sounds perfect - it's quiet at idle, even when turned up all the way, bass and treble knobs are strong as is the Vibrato speed and intensity.  All original other than 3-prong cord and speaker changed out with a Weber C10Q.  The Weber C10Q is felt by many to be the perfect replacement speaker that sounds better than stock.  This amp is in lovely vintage condition with no noteworthy flaws and a nice buy in a very useable vintage amp at $750.  (Note: I also have a nice blackface AA964 for $879 on my amps page).  

  18. 1962 Fender Blonde Tremolux Head & Cab, (tilt-back), (back), (head-click to expand), (tops), (label).  Another one!  Now I have three '62 Tremolux sets in stock.  Model 6G9-A, date coded June '62.  Cab is loaded with a pair of Jensen C10Q's from 12th week of '67.  The Tremolux is a great amp for small to medium venues, with 35 watts of Fender power, and plenty of headroom for a medium powered amp.  It does have a nice break up at just over 1/2, but there's plenty of clean volume before that happens.  Appears to be in original condition and pretty nice for a blonde-era.  A few stains here and there, the worst of which is on the top of the head and cab but they'll possibly clean up if you're so inclined.  As I've pointed out before, if this were a new boutique hand-wired head and cab you would expect to pay to $3K or more for a head & cab.  Blonde Fenders have really taken off in recent years but are still a bargain compared to the tweed amps from 2-3 years earlier.  You can still find one in pretty nice shape, this one for example, at $1950.  These P10Q's are original equipment for a number of '67 Blackface amps (Vibrolux, Super, etc.), so I'll knock off $200 if you want to order some quality new speakers in place of the '67's.  You can get better sounding pair of speakers for $200 and get the amp for just $1750(SOLD-1/29/14).  

  19. Fender Princeton Recording Amp, (panel), (top), (back/panel/label), (acc.), (speaker).   "As new" condition.  From Fender's Pro Tube Series comes a new take on one of the true quintessential studio recording amps.  Based on the blackface '65 Princeton Reverb, the Princeton Recording offers the great tone and dynamics of the original model, but with some modern features made specifically for the studio.   The all-tube circuit and reverb circuitry is based on the '65 Princeton Reverb, but with 20 watts through a pair of 6V6's, and a 10" Jensen C10R, it gives you Fender's vintage tone with enough output for small gigs and rehearsals.  The trans-impedance power attenuator lets you crank up the amp for full output tube overdrive and set the speaker volume as low as you want - all the way down to zero for headphone use.  Other features include two classic onboard "stomp box" effects (overdrive and compression), genuine tube-driven Fender spring reverb by Accutronics, headphone output, speaker emulated XLR line output with level control and ground lift, speaker output jack (internal speaker may be disconnected for use with other 8-ohm enclosures), professional FX loop, and four-button footswitch.  Effects are true bypass.  The 4-button footswitch controls Overdrive, Compressor, Effects Loop, and Reverb.  When you break this amp down, it's a dead-on blackface Princeton Reverb circuit and top row of controls.  If that's the only sound you're looking for you'll be happy with it without even venturing below, to the second panel.  It's this second panel that really provides a lot of versatility.  This is a great sounding compressor that's also fairly quiet, that you'll want to use on country licks, jazz, and fusion.  The 3-knob distortion covers a very wide range and easily pushes the amp into rock and metal tones.  The attenuator is good for any style of music.  If you want a classic blackface tone with the power tubes running full up but want more of  bedroom volume, you've got it.  All in all, I am totally impressed by this amp.  Here's a pretty good demo from Ballew's Music (link) and click here for full spec's from Fender.  This amp is in super clean condition; don't see a flaw anywhere.  Recently discontinued, this amp listed for $1750, selling new for $1399 but this one's in perfect condition and just $950 $850. Includes factory sealed footswitch and manual. 

  20. Fender 2X12 Blonde Custom Made Cab, NOTE: HEAD IS SOLD.  (cabinet), (cab back), (extra panels), (speakers).  Both head and cab (30"X20"X11")are in matching blonde tolex, identical to factory original except not yellowed out like an original - and grill cloth is slightly different with oxblood on the head; wheat on the cab.  The quality of work on these is outstanding, done by Brian Bradshaw at BLB Sound.  The cab features a killer combination - Celestion Vintage 30 and Electrovoice EVM-12L - the best of both worlds - wired at 4 ohms.  Additionally, the cab includes additional back panels (top and bottom) in case you prefer the tone of an open-back design.  The previous owner sunk a lot of money into restoring/building this setup.  The cab matches well and the quality is as good as anything being built by the bigger builders and with the open-back option, you can try it both ways and stick with the tone that works for you.  With around $400 in speakers alone, this custom cab is a sweet deal at just $499.  

  21. 1968 Fender Bandmaster Head, (panel), (back), (top).  The famed AB763 circuit - this is identical to the Blackface model, except with early Silverface cosmetics with the drip-edge trim (pic) around the grill.  Excellent sounding in very nice shape, with less than an hour on it since benched and tuned up, including a new pair of pricey Svetlana 6L6's power tubes.  This amp sounds perfect and needs nothing - ready to take to a gig tonight.  No snap, crackle, or pop from tired components, all the pots and switches work perfectly.  If you've ever heard a properly tuned Bandmaster, you know what I'm talking about.  45 watts classic Fender tone make this a nice choice for a club amp, although it might be a tad loud for bar gigs.  Cosmetically it's very clean with the worst flaws being some corrosion to the straps and handle caps on top, and some minor finish reaction on the panel.  Grill cloth and tolex are in very clean shape.  All original except for grounded 3-prong wire and a small corner of the back panel was cut off to allow space for the power cord.  With Blackface Fenders commanding top dollar, these early Silver's gives you the exact same tone at a lower price.  For a clean '68 that sounds perfect, an excellent value at $599(SOLD-Phil J 7/19).

  22. Fuchs Lucky 7 Head - Purple, (panel), (top), (back).  I get a lot of requests for hand-wired low-power amps, as more and more players are becoming informed about tube amps.  Quite simply, a tube amp that's cranked, with the power tubes running hot sounds a lot better than a higher powered amp running at lower volume, getting the preamp distortion by cranking up the gain.  More players are doing studio work out of the home, where a 50-watt tube amp will alert the entire neighborhood that you're recording a new track.  The Lucky 7 is the perfect amp for studio's, back stage, or even clubs if mic'd and run through the house system.  The output is a very nice, and deceptively loud, 7 watts via a single EL34 tube - or change to a 6V6 (no user biasing required) to lower it to 5 watts.  The Lucky 7 has the high build quality and awesome tone of Fuchs' bigger amps, although in a more affordable price range.   It's based on a dual 12AX7 preamp stage and a unique single ended 7-watt EL-34 fixed bias output stage.  The Lucky 7 also has a full compliment of flexible tone controls to tweak your tone.   This amp has a remarkable amount of clean headroom before distorting into a sweet, decidedly rock, overdrive.  Voiced like its bigger siblings the Train 45 (which I just sold) and Blackjack 21, the Lucky 7 has a classic rock voice similar to a vintage Marshall or Trainwreck, with a cutting rock edge that's filled with harmonic richness and chime. The circuit design also is attenuator friendly - it has a preamp stage designed to allow clean-to-mean from the guitar volume control.  The chassis is aircraft grade aluminum with an internal construction of mixed PC board and hard wired.  The preamp tubes and power supply circuitry are on the circuit card, while the power tubes and transformer are mounted direct to the chassis.  Single point grounding keeps it free of hum at all levels.  Other features include:  ¾ solid wood cabinet with durable tolex covering, anodized aluminum chassis with long-lasting silk screened labeling, heavy duty Cliff brand jacks, solid metal shaft Alpha potentiometers ultra-long-life neon pilot lamp and heavy duty AC power switch, and simple user adjustable fixed bias.   Again, output is 7 or 5 watts (EL34 of 6V6), into 4 or 8 ohms.  For full specs and sound clip, click here for Fuch's site or here for several YouTube demo's.  The Lucky 7 head in purple sells for $1114, with no discounts that I've seen.  This one is barely used in extremely nice shape, for $799. 

  23. 1966 Gibson GA-20 RVT "Minuteman", (panel), (top), (back), (footswitch).  This amp has been in stock for around 2 years and I finally got it out to our tech to get it sounding "right".  I thought about posting it as it came in - an okay sounding amp that could benefit from some tweaking.  I'm glad I decided to wait to get it benched so I can offer it as an excellent sounding amp with a fairly crisp clean tone and an excellent breakup at low volume that should appeal to blues players.  Everybody loves vintage Fenders and during this era the comparable model would have been a blackface Deluxe Reverb.  I honestly don't know why Fenders are so expensive compared to Gibsons.  Both are very solidly constructed with comparable transformers and other components and point-to-point soldering.  Fender smartly stuck with generally the same models from year to year while Gibson tended to turn out different models every few years.  Most of these were good designs but the market never got familiar enough with any of them before a new line was released.  The GA-20RVT is a low wattage amp, perhaps 8-12 watts but, regardless, not the 20 that the model suggests, with reverb (RV) and Tremolo (T).  Most American amps, and British for that matter, weren't using Fender's 6L6 or 6V6 power tubes and this model uses a pair of 6BQ5S power tubes 5 preamp tubes (3 12AU7 and 2 6EU7).  It's  2-channel amp with Volume, Treb, Bass on Ch-1; Loudness, Treb, Bass, Reverb, Tremolo Depth, and Tremolo Speed on Ch-2.  Effects are footswitchable via a 2-button footswitch (included) with a long cord attached to the amp.  All components are original; trannies dated 1966, CTS 12" speaker dated '66, original 2-prong power cord.  Cosmetically the panels and covering are in good shape and the worst flaws are some rust on the centers of the knobs and on the handle, plus one of the back panels is missing.  If you're looking for a quality tone in a hand-wired USA amp, for around 1/3 the cost of a Fender, this might just be the ticket.  In fact this amp scored an overall "10" on Harmony-Central (link).  Everything was just tweaked and the amp works perfectly.  A good value at $499.  Includes schematic and original footswitch.  

  24. Gibson GA-5 Les Paul Junior Amp, (side/back).  5-watt lil' screamer!  Oh man, what a monster this baby is.  If you're looking for an overdriven tube tone for practice or studio, this could be just what you're looking for.  Very little clean tones - starts to break up around "3" and around "5" it achieves what most amps achieve wide open.  Turn the knob past 5 and you get more saturation at every number, unlike some amps where there is little difference between initial break-up and full volume.  I am very impressed with this one and hat's off to Gibson for coming up with a reissue that's even cooler than the original.  Not a cheap amp, but comparable to most of the boutique Champ clones in that it's hand-built with point-to-point solder - with single-ended Class A circuit with an EL84 power and a 12AX7 preamp.  Excellent sounding 8" "special design" Goldtone speaker with hardwood cabinet covered in cream tolex.  Looks good inside with a polished chrome chassis and a remarkably large power transformer (pic2).  Other than 3 small nicks in the tolex in back (shown here), flawless cosmetics.  Every studio needs an amp like this and with a list price on new of $1150, this one's just $429.  Ships in original box with manual.  For Gibson's specs, click here.   Note: I have this identical amp except in yellow tolex, also made by Mojotone (pic here) on my amps page for $399. 

  25. Gibson GA-5 by Mojotone Amp, (pic2), Identical to the Gibson amp above (side by side), other than a different speaker and yellow tolex but identical case, chassis, and same quality components.  I've heard that Mojo built Gibson's GA-5's but also built a few like this one without the Gibson logo and "Les Paul Junior" screened on the control panel.  It's an excellent sounding amp with the same tone and response as the GA-5 above and in perfect shape.  Any studio needs an amp like this.  $399.  

  26. Goodsell Super 17 MK II Tweed, (panel), (back), (top), (speaker).  New - full warranty - hand-wired 1X12 combo.  Don't confuse this with the new 17 Express, which is a different animal with a few cost savings features.  The Super 17 MK II is the predecessor of the MK III, but without the 5W-17W switchable power.  If you're looking for a club/studio amp, you'll likely only run 17 watts regardless.  An updated version of the original 17, added to the MK II are tremolo (speed & depth), and reverb.  At 17 watts, this is now a perfect club amp, along the lines of a Deluxe Reverb.  Features include dual EL84 power in a push-pull design, 12AX7 triode preamp, solid state rectifier, and it's solid pine 9"X21"X24", slightly larger than a tweed Deluxe and weighs in at only 29 lbs.  This is a very musical sounding amp and is one of the few amps I've had where it sounds good with the gain turned up and the master turned down - for most amps this is the "buzzy overdrive" setting but for the Super 17, it sounds more like power tube saturation and less like overdriven preamp tubes.  For more info on Goodsell amps, click here for their home page.  For sound clips and awards, including the Guitar 1 award for the Super 17, click here.   Richard builds these in batches of 12 and he's sold out by the time the production run is finished so I was happy to get my hands on a pair.  After I gave up on Budda's production of hand-wired amps, I was very happen to pick up a line that offers a top quality built, with a superb tone.  I'm happy to see Goodsell doing a big push on advertising as this is one area where many boutique builders have failed.  These are sold everywhere at $1999+ shipping but this one is a smoking deal at $1750, including free shipping to the east, or just $25 west.  For sound clips and awards, including the Guitar 1 award for the Super 17, click here.   

  27. 1978 Marshall Super Lead, Mod. 1959, (panel), (top), (back), (bottom), (chassis/tubes).  Few amps have attained "holy grail" status, and by this I don't mean the rarest of the rare, rather an amp whose reputation is so iconic that it tends to be the most highly sought after for certain seekers of tone.  Other amps that fall into this category are the Blackface Deluxe Reverb, Tweed Bassman, Boogie MK IIC+, and some of the truly rare like Dumbles and Trainwrecks.  If there is one amp that defined the sound of Rock music, it is the Super Lead, Model 1959.  This model achieved benchmark status beginning with Townsend and Hendrix and carried on through EVH, with a virtual who's-who of rock players since.  While the '67-'69 Plexi, with their Plexiglas front panel is the most highly cherished of the 1959's, clean examples of that model sell for as much as a nice car and, quite honestly, it sounds about the same as these later models.  With 100 watts of pure Marshall tone, this amp is way loud and when cranked up, you'll not find a more pure rock tone.  Inside this amp and it looks 100% Jake, complete with hand-wired circuit and no evidence of replaced components or overheating.  As you can see in the pics, this is likely the cleanest examples on the market.  The only noteworthy flaw I've noted is slight oxidation to the polished brass handle (shown here).  Tubes are all vintage, with a quad of old EI 6550's and Servicemaster 12AX7's in the preamp.  This amp is tuned perfectly and needs nothing to create what might be the finest tone you've ever heard.  If you've ever heard a 1959SLP, you know that it's an extremely loud amp.  If you're going to play in a club, be prepared to use an attenuator.  Amps in this condition are quickly fetched up by collectors and are forever removed from circulation.  The beaters make the rounds; the keepers get kept.  They also don't come cheap, but with a reissue JMP 1959SLP head selling for $2349, wouldn't you rather have this 33 year old beauty...for less, and one that sounds as good as it looks.   $2200 for this iconic amp that can be the centerpiece of any amp collection, or a killer amp to take on tour if you promise to take care of it. 

  28. Hi-Watt Custom 7 Hand-Wired Combo, (back), (panel), (top), (chassis), (circuit), (manual).  Model SA110, designed and manufactured in Hi-Watt's Custom shop in England.   The Custom 7 is a little 7-watt Class A with a 10" Fane speaker that features the legendary English hand-wired construction of Hiwatt's Classic Series. Designed specifically for the home and studio environments, where you want to drive an amp into the "sweet spot" without driving neighbors crazy, it is truly the classic Hiwatt sound in a small package.  Using a Single-ended output stage with two ECC-83's and one EL-84 together, it features Master Volume control, individual Gain, Bass, Mid and Treble controls, High and Low inputs.  The Boost knob pulls out to get a higher gain tone at lower volumes and when pegged all the way, it still puts the amp over the top.  It's a very simple circuit but built with quality components throughout.  A look inside reveals point- to-point hand wiring, turret tag boards (no printed circuits), and hand laced wiring harnesses. The power and output transformers are manufactured by Partridge, the original 1970's supplier to the original design sheets.  The components and wires are the modern available equivalents of the vintage components, 1-watt carbon resistors, and wound polyester capacitors.  They even use Fane speakers, just as they did back in the early days.  For Hi-Watt's site info, click here.  A quality amp of this design isn't cheap.  This little baby lists at $2899 and sells at $1969 to $2100 at discount.  This amp appears to have seen zero use and could easily be sold s new.  Offered here for just $1379. 

  29. Kendrick K-Spot Combo, (panel), (top), (back), (tube reverb), (Celestion Alnico Gold), (acc.).  From one of the all-time amp guru's, Gerald Weber, and hand built in Texas, the home of great tone.  The K-Spot is Kendrick's most popular point to point handwired amp, known for it's phenomenal tone, it's aged pine cabinet, and its feather weight 35 lbs.  The prominent ‘K’ on the front of the cab (K stands for "Killer").  Well, it's there for a reason; high frequencies come from the center of a speaker, whereas the mids and lows come from the sides and so having what is effectively a baffle over the center of the speaker means that the sound output is more balanced, wherever you are in the room.  The K-Spot is all about simplicity and quality tube tone, specifically a wonderful bell-like chime.  Just three knobs on the panel - plus another 3 inside the cabinet for the tube reverb.  You don't have to spend a lot of time dialing in your tone.  At a Volume setting of 3 or even less, it’s loud and clean enough for jazz gigs.  At around 5, it’s perfect for hard-driving blues or rockabilly. From 5 on up the K Spot delivers throaty distortion as you go from there, losing its tweed character and assuming a more aggressive, Marshall-like response.  Its 4 inputs are eached voiced differently with with #1 being the brightest, #2 slightly less bright, and so on.  If you’re into riding your guitar volume to morph between rhythm and lead, this is the amp for you.  No matter how hard you’re running it, though, the K Spot always cleans up well when you turn your guitar down, and it stays crisp and articulate. This amp isn't capable of bad tones so all you need to do is tweak the bass and treble to your guitar and the room.  The reverb is noteworthy and in the style of the old Fender outboard reverbs features Dwell, Mix, and Tone.  It is the most natural sounding reverb you'll find on a combo.  It reacts to your pick attack as well as anything I've played.  With a soft attack it's crystal clear; pick a little harder and you'll hear some hair around the edges; harder yet and it'll snarl at you; but lay in to that pick attack and she will break into a controlled feedback sustain.  Best of all, is the huge sound this baby delivers and you didn't have to lug around a 60 pounder to get it.  The K Spot is built with ultra lightweight 100-year-old pine.  This one also features an upgraded Celestion G12 Alnico Gold 12" speaker!  Although rated at 35 watts don't be fooled.  It really cuts through a mix and hold its own with amplifiers rated at 100 watts.  For more info, visit Kendrick here.  There are some glowing reviews on Harmony-Central (link) where it received almost all 5 stars in every area.  The K-Spot sells new for $2895 with a wait time of a month or two - or you can get this one, in mint condition, for just $1999.  

  30. Marshall Haze 15 MHZ15 Tube Guitar Head, (panel), (top), (back), (optional footswitch (close-up).   The Haze 15 combines classic tube tone, with modern day digital effects, the best of both worlds.  For players who like to keep things simple, with this baby there's no more hooking up a bunch of stomp boxes - you've got emulated spring Reverb, as well as Echo, Chorus, and Vibrato.  With a 12AX7 to warm up the preamp, and a 6V6 cranking out 15 watts of tube power, this amp has the warm, natural sound of a tube amp.   It's diminutive size, just 19.5" wide, makes it more desirable for players who don't want the look of a full stage rig, but the vintage styling is straight out of the 60's.   Designed in the same style as the big Marshalls, the 2 distinctive footswitchable channels of the Haze offers a variety of tonal possibilities. The Normal mode provides a rich and organic clean sound with loads of headroom, while the Overdrive channel delivers a warm overdriven tone, with a separate Gain control to dial in as little, or as much, grit as you want in your tone.  A Bright switch is shared between both channels - when engaged it adds extra bite and sparkle.  Both channels also share a shared 3-band EQ.  Channel effects are remembered when you return to the channel, meaning you can set up your clean and overdrive sounds and return to them over and over again without having to readjust your settings.  The warm emulated spring reverb has its own independent control, allowing you to add as much reverb as required, and it also has a positive off (click) position when you want it out of the circuit completely.  Click here for a good YouTube demo from Nevada Music (UK).   The optional Marshall PEDL10049 4-button footswitch IS INCLUDED with this amp and has controls for Channel Select, OD Boost, Reverb, and Effect, with an LED indicator for each button. These sell new for $599 but this one is in brand new condition AND includes the optional $69 footswitch, all for $469.  Note:  They make a cabinet specifically for the Haze, but it should also work great with the C110 below.  The width is an identical 19.5", the head and cab share the same wattage, so you would get optimal speaker breakup, and it's rated at the proper 16 ohms.  

  31. 1984 Marshall JCM-800 Model 4212 2X12 Combo - Master Volume - Channel Switching - Reverb, (back), (top), (panel), (back panel), (sides).  I've had great luck finding some killer JCM800's, which are the pinnacle of Marshall amps according to many experts and players.  The 4212 is a 50-watter (dual EL34's) with channel switching and reverb.  These Master Volume/Split Channel/Reverb amps came in 4 versions, the 100W head and 2X12 combo (2210 and 4211), and 50W head and 2X12 combo (2205 and 4212).  Michael Doyle, author of "The History of Marshall", holds the 2210 as his personal favorite of the entire JCM800 line (page 48), which is a sentiment that I share.  These were the amps that bridged the old and the new, still with the same basic circuit and quality components of the JMP line, but with all the "modern" features like dual channels, effects loop, D.I. output, and reverb - and all were "new"  to the JCM800 line, i.e. weren't previously in the JMP line-up.  These came in both 6550 for the USA tone and, like this one, EL34's for the UK tone.  The tone is pure Marshall crunch and, typically, not a lot of clean tone on these so your channel switching can be overdrive/move overdrive.  Although they don't get a shimmering clean tone like a Fender, few amps will beat this for creamy and crunchy tones and in this amp you'll hear the tone used on 80% of the rock/metal acts from the 80's and 90's.  Features include a "Normal" channel and "Boost" channel, the former with only gain - bass - treble controls; while the Boost has a red light when engaged, and has the usual bass-mid-treble-volume-gain.  Both channels share a master volume (thus 3 gain stages on the Boost channel - and overdrive ability on the Normal channel - plus a shared Presence control and master Reverb.  The rear panel has an effects loop and D.I. output with level control.  Appears all original other than speakers changed to a quality pair of Eminence G1's with heavy Alnico magnets.  Cosmetically, this amp isn't a near mint museum piece.  It has seen some road use so there are miscellaneous flaws to the covering, stains on both sides, a bit of tape here and there, and a replaced knob, but despite cosmetics, there is nothing "tired" about this baby.  They have reissues some of the JCM800 line, with street prices starting around $2K - but I'd never consider any reissue when the real deal is available for less.  This amp is 27 years old and sounds fantastic.  Everything works properly and it sounds well-tuned and read to gig.  A killer and complete backline set up for $1199.  I probably have a 2-button footswitch (channel/reverb), possibly a later Marshall with LED indicators. 

  32. 1984 Marshall JCM-800 Model 2205 Master Volume - Split Channel- Reverb, (back), (chassis), (top), (panel), (back panel), (top), (f/s).  Another great JCM800, original series, very clean, and monster sounding 80's Marshall.  The 2205 is a 50-watter (dual 6550's) with channel switching and reverb.  Along with the 100W version of this head (2210), this is my personal favorite of the JCM800 range.  The 2205 was one of the few models that were "new"  to the JCM800 line, i.e. wasn't previously in the JMP line-up.  The tone is pure Marshall crunch and, typically, not a lot of clean tone on these so your channel switching can be overdrive/move overdrive.  Although they don't get a shimmering clean tone like a Fender, few amps will beat this for creamy and crunchy tones and in this amp you'll hear the tone used on 80% of the rock/metal acts from the 80's and 90's.  Features include a "Normal" channel and "Boost" channel, the former with only gain - bass - treble controls; while the Boost has a red light when engaged, and has the usual bass-mid-treble-volume-gain.  Both channels share a master volume (thus 3 gain stages on the Boost channel - and overdrive ability on the Normal channel - plus a shared Presence control and master Reverb.  The rear panel has an effects loop and D.I. output with level control.  Features original Drake transformers and the original EL34's (UK version) was modded to run 6550's, which made it the export (USA) version.  Other than some black paint along the bottom edge of the back panel, this amp is in nice shape with clean panels and covering - definitely nice shape for an 800 which are notorious for road wear.  They have reissues some of the JCM800 line, with street prices starting around $2K - but why get a reissue when you can a very nice 27-year-old real deal model for just $1199.  Includes recent Marshall footswitch which we can re-label the second button as "Reverb" if desired.  

  33. Marshall 4X12 - JCM800 Model 1982A Cab, (back).  Fairly rare cabinet which was a high-power version of the 1960A, made expressly for the higher powered (250W) Model 2000 (guitar) or Model 2001 (bass heads).  When these rare heads were produced in 1981 at the start of the 800-series, Marshall didn't have a cab that could handle the output and thus the 1982A/B, rated at 400W, was introduced around '82 to handle the power.  Although you don't see many of these on this side of the pond, they were actually in catalogs from '82 to '87.  From what I've read, original speakers for this cabinet would have likely been G12H-100 Celestions.  This one is loaded with G12M-70 Celestions which are more noted for being stock in the 1960A/B cabinets early to mid 1980's.  This, combined with the fact that these speakers will only handle 280W, makes me fairly sure that they're not original to this cabinet.  As you can see, this cab has been roaded a bit and the covering in back has been torn.  We can recover the back if desired for around $70 parts & /labor, or less if you just want the center "slice" re-covered.  Originality aside, this is a pretty rare cab compared to the common 1960A and, especially if you're into hard rock, these G12M-70's are good sounding speakers.  All considered, a pretty nice deal at $599.  If you ever come across a 2000/2001 head, you've got a rare bird.  The new cost on these was 2X the cost of a 100W head and  because of this--plus the fact that they're simply too loud for anything other than a stadium tour--very few were produced.  

  34. Marshall JCM800 1960B 4X12 Cabinet, (pic2).  Bottom cab for your full stack, includes casters.  Hard to find mate for your JCM800 head, and the perfect match for my JCM800 1960A on my amps page (shown here).  Loaded with original British Celestion G12T-75, 75W speakers, this 300W cab should never blow a speaker and has obviously worked night after night for many years.  It has obviously seen its share of clubs in its 20 years as evidenced by a few nicks here and there and a large piece of covering missing from the back which we can paint black at no cost - or spot repair with tolex for $50 - but, hey, this is an old Marshall cab and it looks "right" just the way it is if you ask me.  The Chinese made G12T-75's are selling for $109/each so at $435, it's like getting a quad of *British* G12T-75's for the price of Chinese and the cab thrown in for free.  Anyhow, $435 and it works perfectly.  Discount for local pickup. 

  35. Marshall JCM800 1960A Cabinet, (back), (speakers).  Hard to find genuine JCM800 cab, loaded with original British Celestion G12T-75, 75W speakers.  Cab is in typical used condition with a few tears to the tolex on back, but looks pretty good from the audience perspective.  If you have a JCM800 and want the proper matching cab, here you go, just $450 plus shipping - or discount applies to local pickup.  

  36. Mesa/Boogie Recto Recording Preamp, (top), (panel), (back), (acc.). If you've tried all the modeling amps and none of them capture the authentic tone and responsiveness of a real guitar amp you're not alone.  Mesa/Boogie recognized this need and created the ultimate genuine tube preamp, based on their Rectifier amp, the flagship of the Boogie line.  This model works great for stage use but its real benefit is in the studio.  Without lugging in a huge amp and trying out different rooms, different mics, different mic'ing techniques, etc., with the Recto Preamp you just plug in one cable and start jamming.  It features two channels and six modes of pure tube tone:   Channel 1 gives you Clean, Fat, or Brit tones, with Channel 2 being the "dirty" channel for Raw, Vintage High Gain, or Modern High Gain sounds.  A Live Bright/Warm Record voice switch gives you added tweaking, and an effects loop is available for plugging in all of your stop boxes or rackmount effects.  Handbuilt in Petaluma, California, the Recto Recording features pure analog "Recto Direct" recording circuitry with six, count 'em six, 12AX7 tubes. Each channel has independent controls for Gain, Treble, Mid, Bass, Presence & Master with Bright Switch and Pad Switch on Channel 1, and Live Bright/Warm Record voice switch on Channel 2. It also has Record Output level control over all channels, Solo Level control, Parallel FX Loop w/stereo returns & mix control, Smart Power function trigger (Controls Smart Power Modes — "Deep, Half Drive or Modern"), independent stereo main & recording outputs, external Switching Inputs, and 2-button Footswitch (Channel 1/2 and Solo).   There are a few YouTube video's (here's one) but I couldn't find a comprehensive demo.  During my live test I ran it through a solid state power amp and it still sounded like a quality tube combo.  Click here for full info from Boogie.  If you're going back to a rack setup for you live rig, or simply want a "real" guitar tone in your studio setup - without having to disturb your neighbors - this will quite possibly be your dream come true.  Offered in truly mint condition with just a few hours use and has never been racked, its a sweet deal at $850(SOLD-Paul H 3/17) or of course guitar trade.  Includes footswitch with bag and original manual.  

  37. ca. mid-50's Mullard 5-10 by E.A.R., (sides), (chassis/trannies), (circuit), (front panel), (Mullard tubes), (Wharfedale speaker).  Okay, ignore the pea green cab.  It's what's inside that counts.  What we have here is a very old hand-wired Mullard 5-10 amp, which was a very popular circuit in England as soon as it was published in "Practical Wireless" magazine in 1954 and, in fact, this same amp is being built today.  Mullard created this circuit and published it as a means to sell their vacuum tubes ("If you build it they will come....") as well as the recommended Partridge transformers.  The amplifier featured five tubes and an output of 10 watts - hence the model name "5-10".  Of those tubes, one was a diode-rectifier (an EZ80), one was a pre-amplifier pentode EF86 and one a double-triode ECC83 as phase-splitter. The power amplification was handled by a pair of EL84 working in push-pull configuration.  Mullard also had a variation, 5-20, which was a 20-watter that substituted EL34's for the increased power.  There is a lot of info on this amp on the web in various UK usegroups.  Click here for the best site I found with a blow-up of the original magazine pages which introduced the amp and another useful link is here.  Although countless numbers of these were built as DIY projects, this one was produced by "Electric Audio Reproducers Ltd" aka E.A.R.  It is a quality made piece with a steel chassis and attractive gold paint including a bottom plate to seal in the circuit.  Controls, Bakelite knobs of course, are an input selector switch, bass, treble, and volume.  The power input jack is in the back and is the typical 2-post UK type (I probably have one around here somewhere).  On the left side of the unit is another power input which I am guessing was to plug in a record player or radio tuner (there's an antenna jack mounted to the chassis) - and small plate with two widely spaced pin holes which I believe was the UK standard for speaker jacks, to be used if you wanted to hook up an extension speaker.   The power transformer is tappable with a jumper to select your required power.  Unfortunately, it's wired or 220V, 230V, 240V, and 250V, so you'll need a step-down transformer to use it.  Since they are painted, I don't know if these trannies are Partridge but chances are many of these component will work on early Vox amps and other UK gear or if you're an audio collector, it's a pretty cool find, especially in the USA.  In my search I found that some of the later models had circuit boards, rather than this point-to-point soldering.  Personally, I think it would be a pretty cool project to transform it into a guitar amp.  Because I don't have a way to test it, it's being sold "as is" but I will offer a refund, less shipping, if you're not happy with it.  I'll mention though that this came from my old "UK-connection" and a few dozen other pieces, all guitar amps, I got from him all worked fine.  This unit is in very tidy condition for its age, even the old Wharfedale speaker looks clean, although there is a little dark gunk around the trannies that probably needs some goo-gone to remove.  $499 for this prize.  

  38. Orange Tiny Terror, (back), (carry case/box).   Orange has a long history in building top quality backline equipment to rock bands, some of the major touring groups of the 70's.  They kind of went away in the mid-80's until reemerging in the late 90's with a very good quality AD series.  In '04 they came out with their Rocker series and their Tiny Terror amps, which are very popular due to their simplicity and excellent tone.  The Tiny Terror is an all-tube, 15 watter that's extremely lightweight and portable.  It even includes a padded carrying case that you can carry over your shoulder.  It features a two stage pre-amp which has a wide tonal range, especially considering it just has volume-tone-gain controls. When you drive this amp it just screams, in a good way that is.  Although moderately priced for a tube head, this amp might make you laugh at the price tags of some of the high-priced boutique Class A heads.  From clean crunch to full on overdrive, this amp sounds great.  At mid gain settings it has loads of vintage British character and is built to the same rugged specs as the bigger Orange amps.  The Tiny Terror switches from 15 to 7 watts for studio use and recording.  If you need portability and quality tone for small gigs or especially studio work, this one beats just about everything that's anywhere near the price.  This one's flawless and just $439

  39. Palmer TriLine and E-Frog, (Stock Pic).  ONLY the E-Frog is available as the TriLine has been sold.  If you're playing one guitar over two amps, but you want to send both amps through the same speaker cabinet - here's the answer, the  Palmer E-FROG. (PGA-02).  This unit is "as new" in original box and available for $79.   Again, this is for the E-Frog ONLY.  

  40. Polytone 102, ca. 70’s, very cool stereo amp with a single 12” and dual 8” speakers, plenty of power, stacked pots for each channel, mono/stereo switch, reverb, some sort of  “octave” switch that acts somewhat like vibrato (only cooler), light-up panel, one of the more unique amps I’ve had and I give it two thumbs up for tone and features, $450.

  41. Simple Amps Traveler 6LA, (top), (back), (panel), (chassis).  Joel Jones is one of the fine new builder of boutique amps, out of Orange County, Calif.  The Traveler series is a new model in his arsenal which combines top-notch components in a portable powerhouse of an amp.  His amps are hand-wired, premium grade parts such as Sozo capacitors, Mercury Magnetics transformers and custom made carbon film resistors.  With the Tavelers Joel has managed a very affordable price point, coming in at 2/3 the price of  his "Big Iron" series of amps. A simple two stage preamp and pair of output tubes drive a Jensen 10" MOD speaker mounted in a 9 Ply (1/2) Baltic birch cabinet with a heavy duty "ruggedized" finish.  Although the size is diminutive, the tone is anything but small, cranking out 40 watt via a single EH 12AX7 into a pair of EH 6L6's.  If simplicity is your thing, and everybody should have at least one pure amp, the 6LA is for you with just high and low gain inputs, volume, and tone - nothing extraneous in the circuit to detract from its pure tone.  Other features include all Mercury transformers including Power, Output, and Choke; All aluminum enclosure; Fully Shielded; Hand wired board construction; Star ground configuration; Sozo caps; Custom made carbon film resistors; 9-Ply (1/2") Baltic Birch cabinet; Locking miter joint construction; Aluminum speaker baffles; Heavy Duty Finish; 15"x17"x8" size.  Click here for a demo of its overdrive tones, and another one here, showcasing its clean settings.   Note the Big Iron and the Traveler use the same basic circuit.  There's also a brief review here, which mentions a comparison to the old Valco/Supro amps of the '50's, a comparison that's repeated in other reviews.  Sells new for $1150 but this one's dead mint and ships in original factory packing, for just $850.  If you're looking for a lot of tone in a small package, I can easily recommend this amp. 

  42. SWR Workingpro 700 Bass Amp, (back), (accessories/box).  Bass amplification has come a long way.  Back in '85 I had a hot backline when I traded up to a Peavey MK IV head, with a massive 210W output, through a matching 1520 cabinet.  Keep in mind that this rig replaced a Peavey TNT100 combo, followed by a Randall 140W head with 2X15 cab.  Since that time technology has come a long way and headroom is what it's all about and at 700 watts @ 4 ohms (450@8), there's enough headroom here to handle any club venue you might come across.   SWR has had specialized in great bass amplification, and ONLY bass amplification, for a few decades and, although not cheap, it's the best gear on the market for a moderate price.  Among the features of this nice unit:  Mute switch (footswitchable); -10dB pad option on input for active pickups; Independent preamp gain and master volume controls; Exclusive SWR Aural Enhancer tone control; 4-band active EQ with variable midrange; Bass Intensifier with level and frequency cutoff controls (footswitchable); Automatic limiter with defeat option; XLR balanced output with pre/post switch, ground lift and -10dB switch; Side-chain effects loop with blend control; Tuner out jack; Unbalanced line out jack; Headphone jack; Footswitch jack for included 2-button switch (switches Intensifier and mute); dual 1/4" and dual Speakon speaker jacks.   For a video demo of the Enhancer, Intensifier, and Wedge, click here for SWR's myspace page.  With a list of $1149, the WP 700 sells new for $799.  This unit appears unused, with only a few hours of play and never racked, offered in "as new" condition with original box, manual, footswitch, etc, for $579.  

  43. SWR Bass 350 Head - CNB Padded Rack - Gries 1X15 Cabinet, (SWR panel), (back features), (CNB Rack), (Gries Cab).   Dollar for dollar, nothing beats SWR for bass amplification in my opinion.  While it's fairly expensive, it's still within the range of most players and the tone can't be beat at any price.  This Bass 350 is a good example.  This model ran from '92 to '02, usually with a red panel which changed to this chrome panel the last few years.  It's straight ahead, without  load of switches or graphic EQ that largely duplicates the active EQ pots, but you can dial in a great tone with any bass and make adjustments to suit any song or venue.  I used the Basic 350 for a few years with nothing but a 2X10 cabinet and the tone was outstanding.   Features include 350 watts RMS @ 4 ohms, 450 watts RMS @ 2 ohms, active and passive inputs, a very effective Aural Enhancer to add "air" and "space" to your toe, 3-ban EQ with variable mid-range EQ, sidechain mono effects loop, effects blend control, built in limiter with LED indicator, limiter defeat switch, cooling fan, fan defeat switch, XLR balanced record out, line/direct out switch, tuner send, dual 1/4" or Speakon output jacks, 2-space rack mountable.  Manual is downloadable here.  The 1X15 cabinet is made by Gries, a small company in Mass.  It's an extremely well made cab, built for years of use.  No MDF here, it's built entirely of 3/4" plywood with a 3/4" baffle.  It's covered in black tolex with metal corners, black basket weave grill cloth, rear ported, and weighs in at just 40 lbs.  Speaker is an Eminence cast frame 300 watt 8 ohm with neodymium magnet.  Size is around 21X21X16, big enough to give you loads of bottom end and thump.  Rack is a CNB 2-space padded, very solidly built with compartments for cables, pedals, etc.  The Bass 350 retailed for $999, cheap in high-end bass terms, in 2002.  This makes great-sounding portable rig and you can own the whole set-up for $679 - or $650 without the rack.  

  44. SWR Workingman’s 160.   One of the later additions to the popular Workingman series.  160 watts, perfect for club gigs; small and lightweight.  Excellent tone shaping with Aural Enhancer, EQ (Bass, Sweepable Mid, Treble, “Transparency”, Gain and Master Volume, Effects loop Blender with “pull” limiter defeat, passive/active inputs, balanced DI output, tuner output, speakers on/off switch, just a ton of features in a 2-space rackmount and a featherweight for a unit that cranks out 160 watts RMS.  It's barely used and very clean shape cosmetically.  Full specs and manual are at SWR's site here.  If you wanted a Workingman’s 160 but wanted to run your current speaker cabinet, save around 50% and get just the amp for $279.  Note:  only $250 with purchase of the SWR Stereo 800 power amp.  

  45. SWR Stereo 800 Power Amp, (back), (manual/output ratings).  If the Workingman 160 above isn't enough power for the big gigs, this baby will rattle the drinks in the back of the room.  With up to 850 watts in the bridged mono mode, 400/side in stereo, this amp is a monster.  The front panel features include, for each channel, a four segment dot display indicating headroom, separate volume controls and an on/off switch. The back panel features include separate balanced and unbalanced inputs for each channel, a ground lift switch for the balanced inputs, a stereo/bridge switch, and individual slave outputs for each channel so that several power amps may be driven from a single signal source. Speaker outputs include two 1/4" phone jacks, one banana jack and one speaker protection fuse for each channel. Also included on the back panel is an external line (mains) fuse.  You can use this with your existing preamp, or in the case of the Workingman 160 below, you can use the 160 watts from the Workingman to power your high frequencies (such as 10" cabinet), and this amp to power your lows (such as a 2X15" cab).  Full specs are at SWR's site here.  This amp had a long run, from '91 to '01, while this one is a '98.  Never abused and good shape for a used amp.  A fairly expensive amp at $1295 retail when discontinued in '01, this one works perfectly and for SWR quality, a good buy for a very loud amp at $399.  Includes original manual. 

  46. THD UniValve, (panel), (top), (tube types), (back), (Yellowjacket).  One of the most ingenious and best sounding amps of all time.  Although there are a few imitators on the market, THD was the first and remains the best, and the one that's overbuilt like no other.  The Uni-Valve has the capability to run on almost any tube including 6L6, EL34, 6550, 7027, KT90, KT88, KT77 and KT66 – all providing unique tones without the need for rebiasing when you change them.  This one even includes optional THD Yellowjacket which lets you use an EL84, which can lower the output to 4 watts.  Likewise, the two preamp tubes can be any combination of 12AX7, 12AT7, 12AU7, 12AY7 or 12AZ7. The UniValve delivers tones from smooth and clear to very aggressive overdrive and is easily capable of driving a 4 x 12" cabinet, yet quite small and light.  It has a built-in Hot Plate Power Attenuator that allows for full output distortion at almost any volume.  Totally handbuilt, the Univalve is a 15W Class A amplifier in a Single-ended Class A circuit.  It features 2 inputs: one for high gain and one for low gain, with Volume, Treble, Bass, as well as Attitude control knob which adds more harmonics and treble for a more edgy sound, while turning it down gives you a sweeter and warmer tone even when over-driven.  A switch selects full power or attenuator, which, when activated, kicks in a built-in Hot Plate output attenuator which is also sold separately by THD and is one of the best attenuators made and features a hard bypass.  Unique noise reduction circuit which uses a yellow light bulb that glows brightly during play (on/off switch included to turn off the bulb). This noise reduction circuit and the transformer-isolated line output make this amp perfect for driving other larger guitar amps or power amps without that overly harsh tone you hear from most guitar line outputs. Although it's only 15 watts, it's a very LOUD 15, comparable to other amps rated at 2 to 3 times the wattage. The low wattage, especially with the attenuator, makes it a great amp for any application and it will sound as good in your bedroom studio as it does in a 200-seat club.  The Transformer-isolated line out has adjustable level control and a built-in dummy load if you only want to hear the tone in your headphones. It features line or instrument level output, allowing you to run into another amp's guitar input, power amp in, mixing console, etc. Output can be 2, 4, 8, or 16 ohms.   Click here for a good YouTube video with several guitars and amp settings; check out the clean to dirty via the guitar's volume knob at 5:00 minutes.  Here's a good site with full specs and some technical info (link) and overall 100 reviews at Harmony Central where it scored all 9's or better (link).  Personally, I love these amps and it is one of the definitive studio amps, that's easily adaptable to any stage setting.  These sell new for $999, inexpensive for a handmade amp with these features.  This one is dead mint, and even with the optional Yellowjacket, $300 cheaper at $699.  (Note:  If you need more output, I have the THD Bi-Valve, with twice the power, available for $950 on my amps page).  

  47. THD Bi-Valve, (pic2), (pic3).  Now with new logo* (as shown here) *Special ordered from Andy, current spec logo.  Bob Dylan's tour was using a bunch of Bi-Valves but THD wasn't getting deserved recognition with the hard-to-see logo older logo so THD switched to these easily visible white logos.  This amp is in mint condition and a very unique amp with some cool features including self-biasing with two output tubes, wired in parallel and combined through a special output transformer, you can use almost any output valve you like without touching any kind of bias adjustment, and the BiValve you can use them in any combination as well.  Along with the capability to take almost any preamp valve, this makes the BiValve even more of an amp-tweakers dream than its predecessor, the Uni-Valve.  Like the Emery Sound, you can just experiment and have fun finding all the killer combinations available.    In addition to the usual volume, bass, and treble, note the "Attitude" control, which works on the driver valve to change its response, and does more or less what the name suggests: either smoothing things out or making them more aggressive.   A The hi/lo power switch is like having a built-in Variac; switching to low voltage adds a squashy dynamic feel and reduces clean headroom, essential for valves like the 6V6 which can't handle high plate voltages.  Perhaps the nicest feature, THD's famed "Hot Plate" power attenuator, which is essentially a $329 bonus feature for free.   The Hot Plate lets you run this baby full out, saturating the power tubes, letting you get that creamy response and natural sounding distortion, at living room volume output.  This amp is built like a tank and the circuit and overall construction, impeccable.  For full specs, click here for THD's site. The Bi-Valve lists for $1795 and sells new at a modest discount for $1529.  This one's perfect and $579 cheaper at $950 which includes original black/chrome logo as well as the new white logo.  

  48. Ca. 1968 Vox Scorpion 4x10 Combo, (pic2), (pic3).   The V116 Vox Scorpion combo amplifier,  introduced in 1968, was designed from a combination of parts and subassemblies from earlier Vox amps.  The closed-back cabinet was the one used by the Royal Guardsman, but it used casters instead of a trolley.  Unlike the Royal Guardsman, the Scorpion cabinet had a full front grill.  Inside it's loaded with four 10" 16 ohm Vox Gold Bulldogs (Oxford made) with ceramic magnets, wired in parallel to make a 4 ohm load.  The preamp and controls are from the Berkeley III head.  The 60-watt power amplifier, mounted to the bottom of the amp cabinet,  is from the Royal Guardsman.  Vox was the best at refining a solid state design into an amp that had the warmth and feel of tubes and this is another good example.  Fairly rare model and a good value in a vintage Vox combo.  Lots of features including bi-level control panel with Normal and Brilliant channels, each with its own volume-bass-treble.  On the lower level there's footswitch input, reverb, tremolo depth, tremolo speed, line reverse switch, and Aux speaker out.  Classic Vox looks with Diamond grill cloth, vertical logo, and top/back control panel.  The Scorpion sold for $529 in '68, which was $30 higher than a Fender Twin Reverb, and a good bit of cash during that era and it equates to over $3000 in today's dollars.  Cosmetically it's in decent shape for 45 years, sounds good, and is a good buy on a rather unique vintage amp at $699.    

  49. 1965 Vox Pacemaker, (panel), (top), (back), (chassis/spkr), (label), (tubes).  Very rare amp.  This Version 2 Pacemaker was the only tube model from the Pacemaker series, and only made in 1965, perhaps into early '66.  Producing around 17 watts through a pair of RCA EL84's, with an EZ81 (6CA4) rectifier, and a pair of ECC83 (12AX7) preamp tubes. All the tubes in this amp are quality vintage USA tubes.  It uses a gold Vox Bulldog 10″ speaker made by Oxford in Chicago.  At first glance this looks like an AC-15, with the diamond grill cloth, vintage basket-weave pattern covering, gold piping and trim, gold logo on upper panel, top mounted controls, and vintage 1-pin plastic corners.  Like the British AC-15, the 17-watt RMS tube output stage of the Pacemaker V-2 is cathode biased.  The preamp uses a slight variation of the "top boost" circuit from the AC-30. The Pacemaker is a single channel amp with three inputs, volume, bass, treble, tremolo speed, and tremolo depth, 3-postiion switch (off/on/standby) with separate jewel lights (red and green) for standby and on.  Back panel features tremolo footswitch jack, and external speaker jack.  Rather large for a 1X10 combo (16" H x 21" W x 9.5" D), although it's very lightweight, thanks to its fir plywood construction.  Tonally, this has the slightly glassy EL84 sizzle and crunch with a hint of AC15 chime, much like most dual EL84 amps, and it replicates the Beatles tones very well.  It also has plenty of juicy sag when you push it, which you'll appreciate, depending on your playing style.  It has a nice Vox clean and the amp stays clean up to "4" (remember, the range is "0" to "6"), with breakup starting at "4", with increasing saturation every 1/2 number all the way up to the max "6".  Appears to be all original other than replacement knobs, upper back panel is missing, and cord has been changed to a 3-prong for safety.  Overall, it's in nice shape for it's age, with no major cosmetic issues.  We just had it gone over by our amp tech and it has 100% clean bill of health, full output, quiet at idle, no extraneous noises, and very musical sounding at all output levels.  For the vibe, condition, and tone, this is an excellent value for a vintage Vox at $799 AND includes a vintage style tremolo footswitch (pic here).  

  50. 2002 Zwengel Banshee 50 Head, (panel), (circuit), (top), (back), (back panel), (used gear review).  Many of you have never heard of Carl Zwengel who ran another one of the boutique companies that fell by the wayside after manufacturing some truly fine amps.  Like most the American boutique makers Zwengel hand-wired his amps--and with some of the neatest work you'll see--and used only the finest components, all of which he insisted be USA made.  What made him unique though was his Banshee, the flagship of his line, wasn't just a re-labeled Bassman, Plexi, AC-30, etc., but truly his own design.  He was the first, and possibly only one, to make a hand-wired high gain amp, and if this isn't enough, he included an equally impressive vintage channel.  Via the front panel switch or with a footswitch, you can go from a "Vintage" (think tweed-era Fender clean) channel and "Modern", which is his high-gain channel that sounds like a hot-rodded Marshall to me.  Part o his goal on the Modern channel was to create an amp that was engineered specifically for modern playing such as dropped tuning and 7-string guitars.  Another thing that's important about this amp:  It is very loud.  Although rated at 50 watts, it compares to an 85 watt Twin or 75 watt Boogie.  Both channels have a gain/master setup so you can get a decent sound at lower volumes but a fine tube amp is really all about burning the power tubes so I always recommend playing in large venues - or getting an attenuator if you really want to hear what an amp is all about, but at a lower volume.  Some of the features include custom-manufactured massive transformers rated at twice the amp's output (note: this is a heavy amp); 16 ga. steel powder coated cold-rolled steel chassis with welded seams and ground smooth; military grade switches and jacks by C&K, Switchcraft, and Carling; precision mil-spec Ohmite and Phillips/ECG high voltage resisters; high tolerance CDE silver mica, Sprague "orange drop, and Atom capacitors; all components hand-wired to mil-spec 1/8" fiberglass/epoxy board; tube-buffered parallel effects loop with send level and mix controls; selectable 4/8/16 ohm output; and a top quality cabinet by Jeff Suites made of 3/4" pine with dovetail corners.  Controls are very straight-forward with a Gain and Level control for each of the channels with a channel selector switch; Bright and Mid switches that have a very pronounced affect; shared EQ controls for Bass-Mid-Treb-Pres.  On the back panel are outputs for 16 ohm - 4 ohm X 2 - 8 ohm X 2; Effects loop with Mix and Level controls; footswitch jack to switch between channels (same effect at the front panel switch).  Lastly, there is a variable "Damping" control to better match the amp to the enclosure you're using and adjust it for the responsiveness that feels right.  This amp, #18, was built in 2002, which I believe was the first year of production.  For a brief bio about Zwengel click here for the forum at vintageamps.com and go to the bottom of the page.   Click here for Harmony Central, where it scored a fantastic 9.6 overall, despite a minor gripe with not having reverb.  This one is in very nice shape except for a few minor tolex rubs on the right side of the panel (pic here).  It was recently tuned up and sounds fantastic.  These amps were only in production for a few years but they sold for $1700 and up, very reasonable for a hand-wired amp of this quality.  It's probably the only hand-built 50 watter I'll ever have near this price - $1099.  

OTHER AMPS

  1. ADA Quad Tube Programmable 2X12 Combo, (front panel - pics pieced together), (3/4 view), (back panel).  The Big Boy - the baddest amp ever made by ADA.  It was also the most expensive, selling for $2399 15 years ago.   This amp is super RARE - try to find another one.  I found one on the web which was actually a NOS model that a store was selling for the same $2399 but has sold since I looked it up a month ago.  I have not one but TWO of these babies.  One of them works perfectly - the other one has a glitch on some of the patches and is priced accordingly.  Looking through the 62 page manual it's clear that there are too many features to list here so I'll just do a brief overview.   Features 150 watt output (true stereo - 75W/Side) with complete digital control of an all-analog signal path, 128 user and 39 factory patches, four low-noise 12AX7A tubes with 10 voicing options an overdrive, onboard compressor, four-band tone controls nine-band graphic EQ, powerful effects, including "Varicab" (programmable cabinet emulator), tremolo, stereo chorus, noise reduction, stereo effects loop with programmable mix control, front panel volume and room compensation EQ, cabinet-emulated XLR output with ground lift s well as unbalanced 1/4" outs for recording, complete MIDI with real-time MIDI for on the fly changing of parameters, rack holster for mounting single rack space to the back, accepts ADA 4X4 MIDI controller.  As I mentioned, one of these works perfectly, priced at $1399.  The other one works perfectly on some patches, while other patches have a low rumble which runs away if you tap the top of the amp - could be an easy fix - it's never been benched.  This one is totally useable on most of the patches and is selling "as is" for 1/2 price; $699.  If you're an ADA fan, this might be your only chance to get your hands on one of these rare and great sounding amps - and a piece of ADA history.   Includes 62-page owner's manual but if you're familiar with the MP-series, you will find it easy to get around on without the manual.  

  2. Alamo 2530 Combo, (panel), (top), (back), (chassis).  Cool little student amp from ca. '67-'70.  This amp takes me back to my early band days when we would take an amp like this and use all three inputs with a guitar and perhaps two mics.  With 3 parallel inputs, the strongest signal would drown out the other two.  Circuit appears to be all original; speaker is a CTS with an irregular date code but most likely 36th week of 1970; quality vintage tubes installed.  This is one of those rare vintage amps that works perfectly with no extraneous noise, sounds quiet at idle, and needs no attention whatsoever.  Low power, probably a 5-watter, with a nice clean tone, and a little breakup as you crank it up.  For $150 a better buy than any of the Chinese low-powered tube amps. It simply has better tone.  Plus I wonder how many Valve Juniors will be in use 40 years from now.  Anyhow, $150 takes it.  

  3. ATA Grade Amp Case, (pic2), by Alum. Road Case Co., best quality you can get and this one was formerly owned by the Army Band where, sadly, money is no object when purchasing band gear.  Interior dimensions are 24X17X12 which is sized for a small/tall combo amp like an acoustic guitar amp.  Flip up handles, very thick stiff padding, built for abuse.  Note: This case does not have casters.  This thing will be around long after we've quit playing.  Original cost on these is over $300 but this one's in nice shape and just $99.  

  4. Carvin V3 All-Tube 100W Head, (panel), (top), (back), (back panel).  100% tube signal path delivers pure tone from warm to shimmering to infinite sustain and crunch.  Three channels offer expanded tone circuits and overdrives, covering everything from Blues to Metal.  Channels 1 and 2 are identical overdrive channels, however, since each offers 3 different Drive settings and EQX Expanded Tone Circuits, you'll be able to dial in numerous variations on each channel.  The 3rd channel is the clean channel, but with its own Drive control and 3 position switch, for players who don't use clean, you'll be able to use this as an additional distortion channel.  The Volume Boost is ideal for leads and solos, kick it in when you need to cut through. Two Smart Loops offer assignable effects to your channels:  simply select your channel and select your Smart Loop.  The assignment is saved and recalled when you play through that channel.  MIDI offers storage of channel switching, Volume Boost On/Off and Smart Loop On/Off.  This thing is built like a tank, with real plywood, rather than the particle board used on many amps, and it's even made in San Diego Calif.  The Master section's controls affect all 3 channels.  The Master volume: controls overall output; Boost control adds up to 9 dB of volume boost and is switchable via optional footswitch or MIDI; Bright control boosts highs starting at 5kHz for added clarity; Mid Cut: dials in a master scooped tone from mild to extreme; Deep: adds low frequencies at the sub-harmonic level; and Smart Loops give you total control of your effects and remembers your effects loop settings for each channel.  Just assign a loop(s) to the current channel and Smart Loop permanently saves it until you change it.  This amp can run on EL34's or 5881/6L6's, with a bias switch on the back panel to change between the two.  It can also run 50W or 100W, again, via the back panel.  It has dual speaker outs and can run at 4-8-16 ohms.  Tonally, this amp has a huge variety of tones in it.  The a 3-way mode switch on the OD channels changes the color of the tone dramatically.  Add in the EQX switch and the tonal range is expanded another 10-fold.  For you metal heads who want your pant legs to shake, this thing has more bottom end than you'll probably use.  It also has a tone of gain to give you as much distortion as you'll ever need.  It might seem to be too many tweaking capabilities but the bottom line is it's easy to dial in your favorite tones and you'll never have to mess with it again.  If, on the other hand, you like tweaking your tone, you'll never run out of variations.  This amp sold new for $1099 factory direct, although Carvin is currently selling V3's at $949 after rebate.  This one is in beautiful shape with very little home use and $350 cheaper at $599.  

  5. 1965 Cordovox Amplifier 3-piece Complete Set, (Leslie), (Leslie-inside  with instructions and label), (amp/speaker unit), (inside "brain").   Made by the Cordovox company during the height of the accordion craze, the Cordovox was a very sophisticated amplification system consisting of 3 parts - (1) amp/speaker cabinet; (2) matching "brain" or "tone generator" as it's called) which contains loads of circuitry and 66 (sixty-six!!!) tubes; and (3) slightly larger Leslie (Tremolo unit) cabinet with a rotating baffle.  This unit is in beautiful shape, other than some discoloration to the grill cloth and seems to work perfectly.  As far as user or travel wear, there is virtually none.  This set appears to have sat, un-used, for nearly its entire life.  Although I can only test it with a guitar I know that the amp cabinet and Leslie cabinet work well.  I don't have a way to test the brain for accordion use but the set is very well preserved and I have no reason to believe that it doesn't work.  The amp/cabinet portion of this unit is basically a guitar amp, with a pair of Jensen C12R 12" (date-coded 36th week of '64) speakers and bottom-mounted chassis housing the transformers, 2 power tubes, and a preamp tube.  The Leslie houses a Jensen C8R, date coded 1st week of '65, and has a rotating baffle to create the swirling sound that Leslies are famous for.  Many stomp boxes have been created to emulate this sound but, trust me, none of them have quite the same effect as a rotating baffle.  It also includes a footswitch to turn on/off the rotation.  I forgot to shoot a pic of the amp panel but it's a simple 3-knob with volume and tone controls.  Although it's low powered, it's a very good sounding tube amp and has a very smooth break-up.  The Leslie really makes this unit though and used in conjunction with the amp, you've got some very sweet tones.  This unit is potentially worth more in parts than it is as a 3-piece set, with treasures such as vintage transformers and original cone Jensen C12R's which are original for many amps, Gibsons and Ampeg among them.  If you're a guitar player with a lot of spare room or you know any accordion players looking for some top-notch vintage gear, the whole setup is just $850 and, again, in beautiful shape.  Includes all cables including a long multi-pin proprietary cable.  

  6. Crate V5 Combo, (top), (back).   Another all-tube single-ended Class A 5-watter, with EL84 power and a pair of 12AX7's in the preamp, with a 10" speaker.  Similar amp to the Palomino above, except an even simpler circuit with just a volume and tone control.  Like the Palomino, the tone control is complex, completely changing the character of the tone, somewhat interactive with the volume control where the tone shift is more pronounced the louder the volume is cranked.   Crate smartly didn't hard-wire the 10" speaker so if you want to run it into a bigger 8 or 16 ohm cabinet, no problem, and will make this amp sound huge.  Epiphone with their Valve Junior seems to have started the competition for a low-priced tube amp, followed by Fender, and then everybody else.  I need to point out that there is no comparison with this amp and Valve Jr./Champion 600.  The V5 is much louder, with a good clean sound, although at low volume, but a great overdriven tone and when you combine the versatile tone control, this amp is chameleon that goes from dark and smooth, to mids that jump out of the speaker, to a scooped mid that actually works for metal.  It's a lot of amp, new in the box, for $129.  I have a few of these so if you want an inexpensive stereo set up, pick up a pair.  

  7. Electroharmonix Freedom Amp, (tilt-back/side/back), (bottom), (panel), (extra battery/psu).  Cool looks, sparkling clean tone, perfect amp for the beach, camping, or subway gigs.  It's also an attractive amp, hand made from solid finger-jointed pine, that wouldn't look out of place in your den or family room.  The Freedom Amp uses a custom 8" speaker, special low-drain circuitry, and controls for volume, tone and bite.  Super low hum and the Preamp Output make the Freedom Amp great for recording and its high power output makes it perhaps the best street amp in the world.  It has a unique  recessed tilt-back leg and handle.  This is the "new" Freedom Amp - the original, from 1972, blew away the battery-powered Pignose with its 55 watts via 40 (yes forty) D-size batteries (pic here) through a 12" speaker.  In typical Mike Matthews fashion, the original advertising was out there.  Check out this ad that never quite made the cut, featuring Mike, "Band Aid Girl", and the Freedom amp (pic).   Inside, instead of 40 batteries, is a single rechargeable battery that's good for 4-6 hours of use.  Should you ever need to replace the battery, they're just $12.50 and, in fact, we just installed a new one so you should have years of no-hassle charges.  Original battery is included but it only holds a charge for 5 min and then sounds like a cool germanium fuzz box for another 10 minutes.  Also includes original power supply unit (charger).  EH discontinued these after a brief run.  I don't know how they made any money with a hand built cabinet of this quality.  Nice sounding amp for just $165. 

  8. Epiphone Valve Junior Head - Refin, (top), (back).   These amps have been getting rave reviews since they came on the market 2 years ago.  At well under $200, now $149, the Valve Junior Head broke the price barrier in all-tube combos.  At 5 watts single-ended Class A you can get a full power tube distortion at very reasonable home levels but you'll likely be surprised at how loud 5 *tube* watts can be.  Controls are as follows:  Volume.  That's it...volume.  Tubes are a 12AX7 preamp and an EL84 power.  It has a nice clean sound at low volume but gets a good saturated tone starting around 4 and attaining increased breakup at virtually every number above 5, and it's also engineered to work very well with your guitar's volume control.  Back it off for clean, turn it up and send the amp into overdrive.   There are a number of mods available for this amp, including a very popular one by Mercury Magnets which guarantee boutique tone at around 1/2 the cost of a boutique amp.  There's even a site devoted to this cool lil' amp, http://www.valvejunior.com/.  While I'm sure these mods are nice, it actually sounds good in stock condition.  This one has been refinished to a bronze color, looks very cool to me, and a nice lil' amp for $110. 

  9. Epiphone Valve Junior Combo.  These combo's have been getting rave reviews since they came on the market 2 years ago.  At well under $200, now $149, the Valve Junior broke the price barrier in all-tube combos.  In addition to obvious cool retro looks, it actually sounds very good.  At 5 watts single-ended Class A through an 8" speaker, you can get a full power tube distortion at very reasonable home levels but you'll likely be surprised at how loud 5 *tube* watts can be.  Controls are as follows:  Volume.  That's it...volume.  Tubes are a 12AX7 preamp and an EL84 power.  It has a nice clean sound at low volume but gets a good saturated tone starting around 4 and attaining increased breakup at virtually every number above 5, and it's also engineered to work very well with your guitar's volume control.  Back it off for clean, turn it up and send the amp into overdrive.   There are a number of mods available for this amp, including a very popular one by Mercury Magnets which guarantee boutique tone at around 1/2 the cost of a boutique amp.  There's even a site devoted to this cool lil' amp, http://www.valvejunior.com/.  While I'm sure these mods are nice, it actually sounds good in stock condition.  Prices on new ones are now $199 ($349 list) but this one's in perfect condition, and just $139.  I also have a matching extension cab if desired.   

  10. Crate CR-110, original wooden “crate” model, neat little screamer for the studio and a vintage example of an original Crate when they were made to look like a wooden packing “crate”.  Clean and overdrive channels, both sound good.  A great little reference amp, it has been my man Martin's bench amp for around 6 years and works perfectly.  He loves the amp and doesn't want me to sell it but for $150 it's yours.  

  11. Epiphone SC-28 Amp, tweed covering, nice shape and upgraded with steel corners and leather handle, stereo chorus via two 8” speakers, footswitchable overdrive and chorus, nice little practice or studio amp for $150 (available in Baltimore).

  12. Fender Hot Rod Deluxe - USA made - With EV Speaker, (back), (top), (control panel), (EV SRO 12L), (footswitch).  Older model, back when they were made in USA, and upgraded with an Electovoice SRO 12L.  The Hot Rod Deluxe is one of the most popular all-tube club amps, capable of a wide range of applications for a Fender.  The unique blend of vintage and modern tones, combined with Fender's classic narrow panel styling, made the Hot Rod Deluxe a classic almost from the day it was released.  It does the Fender clean very well with natural sounding tube-driven reverb, but has lot more gain than your average Fender and does the Rock/Metal tones very well.  At 40 watts, it's perfect for medium/large clubs and 3 selectable channels (Clean - Drive - More Drive) give you a good selection of tones selectable via included footswitch - and perhaps best of all, at 45 lbs., you can tote it from home to a gig with ease.   Click here for Fender's info and here for a brief demo on YouTube.  The Hot Rod Deluxe II, made in Mexico, sells new for $729; this older USA model is in beautiful condition with a top quality speaker that makes a marked improvement in tone, and is just $550.  Includes footswitch and cover (not shown). 

  13. Fender G-Dec, (back).  I have 3 of these in stock, including mint in the box with manual, one in very good condition, and this one, in excellent condition.  Way more than an amp, the G-Dec is a great practice tool with backing tracks (bass, drums, onboard midi synth), multi-effect, phrase recorder, looper, and more.  I have used one of these as my personal amp for over a 3 years, testing guitars several times a day and, more importantly, to take a brief break from work and just jam out.  It has improved my lead skills tremendously, just working through the 100 or so songs and patches.  It's easy to program - I've yet to read a manual - and sounds very good.  If that's not evidence enough, Eric Johnson uses a G-Dec as his backstage amp and hotel room practice amp. Click here for G-Dec specs at Fender's site including a good demo from Eric.  YouTube also has a ton of demo's - click here and here.   I'm not going to get into all the features since a video is worth a thousand words and the demo's are better than my writing skills.  Features master volume and tone, loads of amps, effects, etc., all of them tweakable, headphone out on front panel, midi in/midi out, recordable looper, click track, and much, much more.  For practicing along with an external CD/Tape/IPod, it has RCA outputs and a stereo 1/4" jack on the back.  The G-Dec puts out 15 watts and an 8" speaker and includes a strap, adjustable for hand or shoulder carry, for easy transport.  Both amps are AC only - not battery powered.   The G-Dec sold new for $269 - this one's super clean and a very cool practice tool for $175(HOLD-Richard T 7/29).  

  14. 1976 Fender Super Twin, (back panel), (tube chart), (spkrs).  One of the second series Blackface reintroduced in the mid 1970's in a series of amplifiers designed by Ed Jahns. The 185W was marketed by Fender to be "the ultimate" in state of the art amplification. Pretty rare amp, produced only in '75-'76 (the Reverb version ran a few more years). The new blackface models overlapped the Silverfaces and both series were available during this run. High power output was in fashion and Fender added two extra power tubes to increase the output to a whopping 185 watts (back panel also boasts 395W "peak music power"). Today, many players consider the "regular" Twin's 100W as being unmanageable if you crank it to a breakup point; 185W is simply over the top. One of the main innovations of this amp was a very sophisticated circuit, and one that was very expensive to build, which included a 6-band active EQ, in addition to the traditional passive Bass-Mid-Treb. The Presence knob on this amp is active, plus a 5-band with frequencies centered at 2300 Hz, 1250 Hz, 485 Hz, 235 Hz, and 100 Hz, with cut/boost if you turn it to the left or right of center. By making the active EQ footswitchable, Fender created a quasi-channel-switching. Answering player's demand for the era Fender also included built-in distortion combined with a boost control via the "Output" knob. The Output knob was activated when the Distortion control was activated. While the Distortion isn't bad, it couldn't compete with the new boys at Mesa-Boogie and while Tremolo and Reverb were on the wane during this era, Fender purists balked at an amp without these signature effects. A solid state rectifier powers the amp and four stages of 7025 tubes (i.e. two complete triodes) were used for the preamp section. It uses the traditional long-tail 12AX7 phase inverter but instead of powering the power tubes, it was followed by a 12AT7 cathode follower as the low impedance circuit was better suited for the 6 6L6's than the 12AT7 phase inverter normally used. In all this amp uses 11 tubes: six 6L6, two 7025, a 12AX7, a 12AT7, and a 12AU7. Original speakers have been replaced with a pair of old Ruby model SP12H100's, made by Eminence. They're the same as the Legend 1258, but with a larger 2 1/2" voice coil. If you're a player looking for more volume than you'll ever need, this might be a good choice. Weighing in at around 90 lbs., this is a lot to lug around, although it does have casters once it's on the floor, but shipping is going to be costly, which is why I'm pricing it low. There's a wide range of prices on these and if you look around the web you'll usually see them at $700-$1200. This one works well and is an interesting piece of Fender history for $599 - plus around $100 shipping. Takes a standard 2-button footswitch with 1/4" stereo jack, labeled "EQ" and "Dist".  We can supply an aftermarket one for $25, or a Fender one for $35. 

  15. Fender Diminsion IV, 70's, for your non-vibrato equipped vintage amps, this give you some very cool vintage vibrato tones via an "oil can" design.  Easy to install - just plugs into reverb jacks on Fender tube amps $175.

  16. First Act MA104, (close-up).  I get in some strange gear.  This isn't as bad as it looks and actually sounds good for its size, much more like a real amp than the little battery powered Fender/Marshall/Vox/etc.  Has a decent clean sound and a cool buzzy overdrive.  Includes power supply.  Mint in original box for $18.  

  17. Genz-Benz ML200 Bass Head, (panel), (back - detail), (top).  Excellent tone shaping for a variety of applications in a lightweight, easily portable head.  The ML200 head features the same amp used in the 112T, 115T, and 210T combos, with the speakers.  This allows you to use the amp with whatever speaker cabinet you prefer, and it's easier to handle a 20 lb. head and 25 lbs. cab, rather than a 55 lb. combo.  The ML200's  flexible dual-output design lets you operate this power amp in bridged mode, pumping 200 watts into an eight-ohm cabinet, or as 2 separate amps, each putting out 100 watts into 4 ohms.  Starting with the input jack, you can select Passive or Active via pushbutton switch, and adjust your gain control until the red overdrive light flashes occasionally.  Tone shaping includes "Shape" controls for Low Boost, Mid Scoop, and Signal Attack, while active EQ includes Low, semi-parametric Mid, and High.  The output knob controls the overall volume and there's a tuner output jack adjacent.  Back panel features dual 100W output jacks, as well as a 200W bridged output.  There's also a fan on/off switch, ground lift switch, XLR Direct Out for recording or going direct to your live mixer, and an effects loop.  Genz-Benz builds good sounding gear at good prices.  If you're looking for a nice sounding head for small to medium gigs, this one's in nice shape and hard to beat at just $199.   

  18. Ibanez GTA15R Guitar Amp. Excellent starter amp for anything from blues to rock to metal. Keep the gain down for nice clean tones, crank it up for excellent preamp distortion. Three band EQ allows you to boost the mids for a nice blues/rock tone - or boost bass and treble for that scooped mid's Metal tone. 15 watt RMS, plenty for any practice situation, through a solid 8" speaker. Features 3-band active equalization, reverb for spacious tones, CD input for jamming along with CD or IPod, and headphone output for silent practing. AC cord stores easily in bottom of amp. For a 15 watt amp with reverb, a sweet deal at $65.  Add headphones below for $13.99 for private practice.  

  19. Ibanez TB15R Toneblaster Amp, (panel), (back).   Nice little practice/beginner combo with 15 watts through an 8" speaker.  Features include dual channels (clean/overdrive), with separate level controls for each - plus the overdrive channel has a gain knob to add the desired amount of distortion.  3-Band EQ is active with center-detented knobs and +/- 12dB of cut/boost.  Good sounding spring reverb.  As a practice tool it includes a CD input to play along with you're CD player, IPod, etc., and Headphone jack for private playing.  This is the last generation TB15R, the new one has a parametric Mid control but for $59, it's an inexpensive choice for a beginner or backstage/home practice amp.  

  20. 6PH1HPO1 Headphones, stereo, full size with comfortable padding, long cable, great for private practice through the Ibanez GTA15R or any other amp with a headphone output.  

  21. Hartke 1X15 Transporter Cabinet 200 watts, $250(mgr)

  22. Hartke 4X10 XL cabinet, terrific punch with sufficient bottom, XL badge is missing but make no mistake, this is the road-worthy XL series and not the lightweight Transporter, $325(mgr)

  23. Hartke Transporter 210 Cab, sealed cab, carpet covered, ¼” input, good choice for use with a 15” or 18” bottom or stand-alone for light gigs, $145.

  24. Lab Series L5 100W Combo Without Speakers, (panel), (back/side), (top), (back panel).  Amp works A-Okay, but it's being sold without speakers.   A good example of solid state amps done right - good enough in fact that the L5 was used by Allan Holdsworth on his first few albums, as well as Ty Tabor on the early King's X albums and its most noteworthy user, B.B. King found his signature tone in an L5 in the late 70's and continues to use them today. B.B. became an official endorser in 1981 (pic of ad) but was already a devoted user by then. If most people listen to any of these recordings they'd likely assume they were hearing a tube amp. The dynamic range and touch sensitivity - and Allan and Ty's pure sounding crunch, don't share much with other solid state amps of the day.  Lab seres are frequently thought to be "Gibson" amps, but Gibson was just sort of an in-law to the Lab company.  Gibson's only relation was distribution of the Labs, and the fact that both companies were owned by Norlin. The actual credit for design and manufacture goes to Moog, of analog synth fame. Although the L5 is the most noted of this series, there were several others in the line including the L7 and L9 which were identical amps but with a different speaker configuration. These are loud amps, rated at 100W RMS and unlike most solid state amps where 100 watts was roughly the equivalent of a 35 watt tube amp, this was a loud 100 watts. Specs and features include: 100 watts through 2X12" speakers; dual channels; channel one is a basic Fender-style layout with Bright switch and Vol-Bass-Mid-Treb knobs. Channel 2 features a lot more control. In addition to the Bright switch, Volume, Bass, and Treble, it features an active type EQ with a semi-parametric midrange control with mid frequency adjustable from 100Hz to 6400Hz along with a corresponding cut/boost knob. It also features a Multifilter knob, essentially a 6-band EQ with fixed settings (centers at 1000Hz, 1370Hz, 1900Hz, 2630Hz, 3630Hz and 5000 Hz.), where you control only how much of the signal thru it gets mixed back with the main signal - sort of like a flanger's comb filter with the sweep set to zero. It also features a good sounding reverb and an onboard compressor that's a personal favorite, with a knob to control the amount of compression with a corresponding LED that lights up when the compressor kicks in. Lastly, a Master Volume knob lets you overdrive the preamp circuit while keeping the output level down. On the back of the amp you have a footswitch input for reverb on/off, effects loop, and an unusual on/off switch that locks in to prevent inadvertent shut down.  There are a few Lab Series sites on the web including DIYGuitarist.  Again, this amp does not include speakers.  It had a pair of early Celestions that were worth almost as much as the amp and they were sold separately.  Speakers shown are just to highlight speaker alignment and are not included.  Overall it's in decent used condition but far from collector's grade.  Buy it because it's a good sounding amp - not because it's a lovely example.  If you haven't heard one of these, you're likely in for a treat and at $299, a good buy on a high-powered 2X12.  

  25. 1995 Marshall JTM60 1X12 Combo, (back/panel), (front panel), (top).  All-tube, feature packed combo that was introduced in 1995 and combined Marshall's classic sounds with many modern features.  The JTM60 (changed to JTM600 in '97) came in four  models:  This JTM612 with 1X12; JTM610 with 3X10's; JTM622 with 2X12's, and the JTM615 with 1X15.  All were loaded with special designed Celestion Heritage speakers.  This line was aimed at the amateur, semi-pro, and pro player, with features that made it equally well suited for the stage, practice room, or studio.  Each channel has its own 3-band EQ plus its own reverb, a deep and natural spring reverb, so you can dial in the right amount for your clean or overdrive settings.  In the rear this amp features both series AND parallel effects loops, extension speaker outs, a Master Presence control, and DI output utilizing Marshall's acclaimed speaker emulation.  The Normal channel is not your regular Marshall clean, which was pretty much "less overdrive" and actually delivers a nice glassy tone that's great for blues, or cranked up, a nice Bluesbreaker tone.  Many players will find every tone they need on the Clean channel and when pegged out, the tone is rather close to a Deluxe Reverb.  The Boost channel is loaded with the vintage drive that Marshall is famous for, and even more gain than vintage Marshalls.  It cranks out 60 watts through either 8 or 16 ohms, which means you can run this with a 16 ohm cab and get the same power output as with the internal Heritage G12 only.  Click here for a YouTube demo - it's the 3X10 version but it'll give you an idea of the range of clean and overdrive tones.  This amp is in beautiful shape; appears to have never seen a gig or logged any club hours.  The tubes, a pair of EL34's and four ECC83's, sound fine and this amp needs nothing.  For tone and features, this is a hard Marshall to beat for $599.

  26. 2010 Marshall MG50FX 1X12 Combo - upgraded speaker, (panel), (top), (back), (speaker), (footswitch).  One year newer but otherwise identical to the one below including speaker upgraded with a Celestion Rocket 50.  Super clean condition other than an MDF dent on the back corner (shown here).  We will do a cosmetic repair with epoxy upon request but there's no issue with structural integrity.  Includes footswitch and speaker upgraded to Celestion Rocket 50 (G12E50).  Marshall's latest in the highly successful MG4 line which has taken solid state to an even higher plane and, in fact, many players will prefer the tone and response of this MG50FX over their tube models.  This amp has about everything you could want in a 50-watt combo, including 4 channels (Clean, Crunch, Overdrive 1, and Overdrive 2), and lets you quickly and easily dial in your favorite settings and save them, plus the front panel is outfitted with 8 LED's so you can see you're settings at a glance.  It also features onboard digital effects including Chorus, Phaser, Flanger, Delay, and Reverb. The settings for each channel can be customized to your liking—with effects if desired—and saved for instant recall.  It features one 12" speaker, an external effects loop, power amp damping which is a subtle but very impressive feature, a headphone/line out jack with speaker emulation, a line in for an MP3 player, and a two-button footswitch which lets you access all 4 channels.  There's plenty of info online about this amp and for a good video overview, click here for Guitar World's demo and Click here for full specs and more at Marshall.   Marshall has always been conservative with their wattage ratings and this 50 watts sounds louder than competing brands 100-120 watts.  With a list price of $580, this is an incredible value on a 50-watt combo with this much power and versatility at just $219Includes Marshall footswitch in box.

  27. Marshall MG2FX Combo, (close-up), (back), (top).  New in the box.  You have to hand it to Marshall.  They can design a little 2-watt solid state combo, and somehow give it the unmistakable classic Marshall tone.  The 6 1/2" speaker sounds more like a 12, turned down to practice level.  The MG2FX is the little brother in the MG4 series and runs on your choice of AC power, or 6 C-cell batteries, for use at the beach, camp site, subway, etc.  For a little combo it's jammed with features and a great selection of tones via four dual-function (push-push) knobs, a Tap/Shift button, and a single-character LED display to provide  instant access to ten distinct gain stage settings, five digital effects, a two-band EQ, and a tuner.  The Gain and Volume knobs—along with the ten-position mode knob—provide plenty of tonal options, including a shimmering clean tone, the famous Marshall "crunch," and all the overdrive needed for an over-the-top lead.  Digital reverb and delay are built-in, with a tap button for setting the delay time (holding down the Tap/Shift button also activates the onboard tuner). In addition, a chorus, phasing or flanging effect provide that extra texture you'll want for many songs.  It also includes an MP3/line input for jamming along to any audio source plus a headphone output allows for private practice, which also serves as a line output for recording or for connection to a larger sound system.  In typical Marshall fashion, this thing sounds much louder than it's 2-watt rating and will hold its own with other famous 10-watters.  I couldn't find a good online demo in English, but here's a good overview of the tones (link) and check some great shredding, with some good clean tones starting at 5:48 (link).  Add up the features and tone and this amp justifies the $205 list price.  I have some of them new in the box for $79.99.  For a grab and go amp with built-in effects, it's the best I've heard in this price range.  

  28. Marshall MG10CD, (panel), (back).  A killer sounding practice/studio/backstage amp, the MG10CD offers 10 watts with an undeniable Marshall tone.  Features include twin channels, Clean Volume, Overdrive Gain and Volume, and a Contour control that takes you from a scooped mid metal tone, to a mid-heavy blues/rock.  Other features include CD input with Emulated Lime Out, Emulated Headphone output jack, designed to make it sound like it's playing through speakers before it gets to your cans, and LED indicator lights for Channel and Power On.  Outfitted with a 6 1/2" speaker in a sealed enclosure, this amp has loads of punch and sounds much bigger than its small size would indicate.  Here's a good demo from Marshall, showcasing both the clean and OD channels. This model was recently discontinued, with a final list of $115, but you'll still see some new ones on the web at $74 to $89.  This one is in mint condition and a very cool lil' amp for $59(HOLD-Karen 4/20).   

  29. Marshall G100RCD Head, (close-up - click to expand).  Marshall does great solid state and, in fact, in my opinion I think they're generally better for metal music than tube amps; there, I said it.  The G100RCD features 100 watts of Marshall power, plenty to power a pair of 4X12 cabs or any other cab that fits the venue.  Features include: channel switching, dual channels each with their own controls, effects loop, reverb, and CD input for practice.  The "Normal" Channel has a switch for "Clean" or "Crunch", while the "Boost" channel is selectable for "OD1" or "OD2", making this, essentially, a 4-channel amp.  This amp listed for $550 but even at that modest price it has a number of pro users, most notably Riggs from Rob Zombie.  this one is "as new", showroom condition, in original box, and a lot of Marshall power for just $275.  If you're a rock or metal guitarist, it very well may blow you away.   I might have a mint-in-the-box Marshall 1960A 4X12 inbound and if it arrives, this will be a killer setup.  

  30. Marshall VS2000 AVT20 Valvestate, ECC83 tube, 1X10 Celestion, clean and boost channels, nice reverb, CD input, DI output, headphone out, ext speaker out, 1” snag in grill cloth but otherwise very clean, this baby has classic Marshall tone in a compact package for $185(available in Baltimore)

  31. Peavey Classic 30 Combo w/Weber Blue Dog, (panel - click to enlarge), (top), (back), (tubes), (spkr).   Small all-tube combo with a vintage looking tweed covering, chrome panel, and chicken head knobs - and better than new with the recent installation of a new Weber Blue Dog Classic British ($110/direct), defined by its warm, clear, loud, detailed high end that doesn't get hard or harsh at high volumes, aggressive, big low end, more headroom than the AlNiCo version.  The Classic 30 offers incredible value for a quality American made tube amp.  It's a fantastic club amp with enough power to play larger sized rooms.  I frequently compare them to Fender's Tube Series and, quite honestly, when I've had these set up at shows next to comparable Fenders like the Blues or Hot Rod Deluxe, the Classic 30 was almost universally chosen for superior tone - and the Peavey is USA made!.  Features an all-tube circuit with a matched quad of JJ EL84's cranking out 30 watts through 16 ohms - with three 12AX7's in the preamp.  Nice sounding EQ that really does something, and very versatile with a crisp clean tone with plenty of headroom - and enough gain to satisfy nearly every rock player.  Features two channels plus boost for 3 distinct tones, selectable via switches on panel or via optional footswitch.  Pre- and post-gain controls on lead channel; Normal volume control on clean channel.  It also features a footswitchable spring reverb that sounds very good, very vintage, and an effects loop.  Full specs, manual, and sound clips, check out  Peavey's Site here.   Click here for a good demo from Peavey but keep in mind that this is the stock speaker and it sounds even better with this Weber Blue Dog.  There are a bunch of YouTube demo's, here's one and here.   Optional footswitch, which uses a stereo 1/4" jack, not included but I may have a 2-button switch for $25 if desired.  Recently discontinued but these sold new for $649.  This one's in immaculate condition and even with the new Blue Dog, priced at $559.

  32. Randal RC235 Stereo Chorus 2X10 Combo, (panel), (back), (back panel).  Ca. 1989.  Good sounding combo with true stereo chorus.  Two 35 watt amps drive a pair of Randall Jaguar 10s, yielding a lush stereo field.  Clean channel has Gain control, Overdrive has Gain and Master; switch between the two via toggle switch or optional footswitch.  They share EQ knobs for Treb, Mid, Bass, and Presence, plus Reverb and Chorus with Speed and Depth.  Note:  The reverb tank was removed from this amp.  It might jut need a new reverb tank wired in, we haven't checked it out. Back panel has stereo headphone jack, extension speaker outputs, Line level signal outputs, effects loop, and footswitch input (channel and chorus on/off).  It's missing one of the back panels but with an open-back amp I don't think it affects the tone.  For a few nice reviews, click here for Harmony Central.  These amps cost $399 20+ years ago.  This amp has been here for years but I just found the pics and apparently it's never been posted.  It's time to move on so blowout priced at $139 plus shipping on an "as is" but working sale.  

  33. Rocktron Velocity 100 Guitar Power Amp, (pic2), (stock).  "As new in box".  Ordered for a rack system that was never built and virtually untouched.  Puts out 55 watts/side at 4 ohms; 40 watts at 8 ohms.  Designed specifically for guitar, the Velocity 100 delivers tube-like dynamics in a single-space, reliable solid state design.   The Velocity 100 utilizes thermal protection circuitry, along with protection from over voltage, under voltage or any shorts to the power supply = reliable performance night after night.  Front panel power switch and two front panel volume control knobs make operation as easy as possible.  With a list of $389 this is an excellent value in a virtually new V100 at just $185.  

  34. 1987 Seymour Duncan 60W Convertible Head, (panel), (back).  Don't see many of these around, especially in the head only version.  Seymour was ahead of his time when he developed the Convertible series back in the mid-80's.  Since that time there have been a number of other amps which used the same idea, basically re-voicing the amp by a simple exchange of a preamp circuit  Randall has had great success with their MATS series, which is the same idea, and actually this was the original "modelling amp."   Each model holds a preamp tube and simply snaps in place when you want to change your amp's tone.  The Convertible 60 holds two modules so you have, essentially, two amps at your fingertips or at the push of a footswitch.  We were very impressed with the tone of this amp during our test with the two installed modules, "Classic - Warm Tube" and "High Gain Tube - High Overdrive & Sustain".  Features include: 60 watts via a pair of EL34 power tubes, dual channel each with an Overdrive and Volume control with corresponding Red and Green Led's (one for clean channel - one for OD channel), footswitch jack, Treb-Mid-Bass controls with +/- 15dB of cut/boost, Reverb, and front panel effects loop.  Back panel has 4 or 8 ohm outputs as well as a Slave out.  The EQ on this amp is very well engineered and it really does a lot, not simply shelving.  Makes it easy to dial in the perfect tone.  There is a handle on one side for easy transport.   Click here for some great reviews at Harmony Central, where it scored an incredible overall 9.7 (out of 10) - and I found a link devoted to this model here.  Although this amp is 22 years old, it works perfectly and the tone holds up as well today as it did back in the 80's.  Overall very nice shape and for a USA made tube head of this quality, a good buy at $429.  

  35. Sunn Studio Lead, 1970's, nice sounding solid state combo, USA made.  It features 50 watts output through a pair of Sunn 10" speakers, with Rhythm and Lead input channels plus reverb.  Overall nice shape for an amp that's 30+ years old - has that aged "patina" that you would expect from an amp that has seen some time in smoky clubs but that just adds to the vibe of these old Sunns.  Tolex covering is in great shape and overall this amp is a well preserved example on the whole.  Is missing one of the back panels which gives it less projection but a fuller tone - no problem performance wise.  If you're a collector but find the $1000 Fenders out of your price range, here's a nice Sunn for just $199.    

  36. 60's Univox 1236 Bass/Guitar Amp, (panel), (top), (back), (chassis), (circuit).  Univox are well built amps marketed under the Univox name, as well as Lafayette and possibly Magnasonic.  Most were made in the USA, few in Japan.  I believe this is a USA model but there's very little info on the web concerning this particular model.  It appears to be Univox's version of the Fender Bassman, basically a dual-6L6 head with volume-bass-treble, with "Deep" and "Sharp" switches with a bass input, plus High and Low guitar inputs, slightly different from the Bassman's bass channel and guitar channel.  Although there's a large sticker on the back boasting "100 watts", back in the 60's it was common to use "peak" or "music" power ratings as a marketing tool and the actual rating is probably closer to 40 watts RMS.  It's virtually impossible to squeeze 100 watts from a pair of 6L6's.  Tubes are a pair of vintage USA GE 6L6 (pic) in the power section with two 12AU7's and a 12AX7's in the preamp.  Like the Bassman, this amp sounds great for bass, although 40 watts won't get you very far with bass thus it's impractical for club gigs, but it would be fine for low volume situations such as church, studio, or practice.  For guitar though, it's plenty of power for club gigs.  It is a clean sounding amp with loads of headroom; only a slight breakup starting around 3/4 on the volume knob.  Very neatly hand-wired inside with heavy transformers.  Should you ever need repair or want to modify it, schematic is available online (link) for free. Nice shape for its age and just out of the shop with new filter caps so it should be good to go for another few decades.   $299. 

  37. Vox Valvetronix AD120VT and VC-4 Controller, (side), (panel), (amps/effects), (top), (back panel), (back), (pedal).  Local sale/trade very much desired on this, the "Big Daddy" of the Valvetronix series and one of the best modeling amps made during the modeling amp wars a few yeas back.  This was Vox's highest power model with 120 watts (60W X 2), with an attenuator on the back to lower the output from 30Wx2, 15Wx2, or 1Wx2, which allows you to tailor the output to the venue (1W/Side is perfect for home).  Other features include Celestion 12" speakers, 16 amp types, 21 effects types, 32 programs (8 banks of 4), chromatic tuner, and Valve Reactor power amp section that recreates classic tube power amp response.   For guys who want to simplify their setup, these amps are perfect as they are able to completely eliminate your effects pedalboard.  Plenty of power for any stage, but equally at home in the studio.  Read over 150 reviews at Harmony Central where these got an incredible “9.1” for sound quality.  This amp was never gigged, home use only, and is overall excellent condition.  A lot of amp for $550 and *includes* Vox VC-4 floorboard with built-in expression pedal and easy access to four user presets.  Manuals are downloadable free of charge at Vox here.  

  38. Vox AC4TV Mini, (top), (panel), (back).  Modern update of the cherished '61 Vox AC-4, which was the bottom of the AC line but still a fine amp in its own right.  I've only had one original AC-4; they're fairly scarce in the States and very expensive for a 4-watter.  Enter the AC4TV, which captures the vibe and tone of the original with its all-tube Class-A design in a small TV-front combo.  A very simple design, it features a 12AX7 preamp tube, and an EL34/ECC83 power tube, with just a volume control, tone (which acts more like a treble cut), and output level switch.  The OP Level is a feature that really sets this amp apart from most of these low-powered tube combos, and is switchable from 4W to 1W to 1/10W, which allows you to get full power tube saturation at the proper listening level.  You might not think this is necessary with a 4W amp but cranked all the way, you've got ample volume to seriously annoy some non-fans.  Crank it back to 1W, or if that's still too loud, 1/10th of a watt.  Carr had this same idea with the Mercury years earlier, and I was surprised at how loud 1/10 of a watt actually was.  It also features a 16 ohm external speaker out in case you want to run into a separate speaker cab.  I played one of these through a Marshall 4X12 and the sound was huge.  The look is unmistakable Vox with diamond grill cloth, classic white covering, top vent, Vox dog bone handle, and pointer style control knobs.  Full more info check out Voxamps.com.   Here's a few YouTube clips (clip1) (clip2) and a cool one with a memory man for "The Edge" type tone (clip3).  These sell everywhere for $249 but this one's dead mint and just $149.  

  39. Vox AC4TV Mini, (top/panel), (box/manual).  Modern update of the cherished '61 Vox AC-4, which was the bottom of the AC line but still a fine amp in its own right.  I've only had one original AC-4.  They're fairly scarce in the States and very expensive for a 4-watter.  Enter the AC4TV, which captures the vibe and tone of the original with its all-tube Class-A design in a small TV-front combo.  A very simple design, it features a 12AX7 preamp tube, and an EL34/ECC83 power tube, with just a volume control, tone (which acts more like a treble cut), and output level switch.  The OP Level is a feature that really sets this amp apart from most of these low-powered tube combos, and is switchable from 4W to 1W to 1/10W, which allows you to get full power tube saturation at the proper listening level.  You might not think this is necessary with a 4W amp but cranked all the way, you're going to annoy some people.  Crank it back to 1W, or if that's still too loud, 1/10th of a watt.  Carr had this same idea with the Mercury years earlier, and I was surprised at how loud 1/10 of a watt actually was.  It also features a 16 ohm external speaker out in case you want to run into a separate speaker cab.  I played this through a Marshall 4X12 and the sound was huge.  The look is unmistakable Vox with diamond grill cloth, classic white covering, top vent, Vox dog bone handle, and pointer style control knobs.  Full more info check out Voxamps.com.   Here's a few YouTube clips (clip1) (clip2) and a cool one with a memory man for "The Edge" type tone (clip3).  List price is $350 but I have a few of these, new in the box, for just $179.  

  40. Vox Pathfinder 10 Combo Mod. V9106, (panel), (top), (back).  One of the cutest Vox's you'll see.  At 10 watts through a 6.5" Vox Bulldog, the sound is far from cute and this would make an excellent backstage amp, studio amp, or it looks nice enough that it wouldn't look out of place in the family room.  The Pathfinder 10 features controls for Gain, Volume, Treble and Bass while a Gain Boost switch increases preamp drive so the amp can deliver traditional VOX clean sounds as well as modern high gain distortion.  One of the things that really grabbed me with this amp is a cool natural compression which works great on country licks and chicken pickin'.  It also has an excellent overdrive channel which sounds much bigger than this little amp looks.  Check it out on a YouTube demo here.  Other features include a jack that doubles as a Headphone or a specially-filtered Line output.  It also boasts classic VOX styling with diamond grill cloth, Vox dogbone handle, white piping, gold trim plate, basket-weave vinyl, and pointer style control knobs.  For more info and manual click here for Vox.  Offered in mint condition for $59.

 

 SPEAKERS:

  1. 1966 Jensens C12R, I can only find one of these so one available.  Barely used and beautiful shape.  Removed from a closed-back Cordovox accordion amp cabinet that looked as if had never been used which is likely if the owner never had the "brain" that worked this complicated unit.  These are the real deal, 41 years old, made the 14th week of 1966 and are original spec for Ampegs of the era including Jet, Reverbojet, and Reverberocket - or would be an excellent choice for many other vintage amps compared with most new replacement Jensens.  Look on Gbase (link) and you'll see these reconed for $125-$150 each.  These are original cone, beautiful shape, and priced at just $99/each (only one available).

  2. Jensen P12Q Speaker in Crate Cabinet, (stock pic).  Vintage Alnico 12" speaker to upgrade your combo or, if you need it, use with the Crate amp cabinet for an inexpensive extension cabinet.  Rated at 40W and can handle 80W musical power.  This is the 8 ohm version which will work well for many amps with either an 8 ohm output - or if paired with a combo's 8 ohm internal speaker for a 4 ohm load.  Mounted in an old Crate combo box, with an input jack nicely installed on the cabinet. The speaker alone sells for $121.  The Jensen is in clean shape with very little use and going for $99 with the cabinet.    

  3. EVM 12L in Cab, (pic2), (pic3), 8 ohms, rated at 200W so you're not going to blow it and served up in a Peavey Futura cab - with an EVM Series II 12L, with removable back for open/closed back operation.  Nice compact design and this one even includes rack rails for rackmount transport.  Put this with a boogie MK series head and you have the essence of a Boogie combo in two lighter packages.  $199. 

  4. Celestion G12M Greenback and G12H30 70th Anniversary Pair.  With the warmth of the 25W Greenback and the focused, tight bottom of the G12H 30W Anniversary, these speakers really complement each other and are paired by several manufacturers.  With the Greenback at 16 ohms and the Anniversary at 8, you're looking at a load of 12 ohms, wire in series, so I'd recommend the 16 ohm setting on your amp.   Both of these speakers are perfect for low-mid powered amps, providing some speaker break-up at 25/30 watts compared to a 75w or 90W speaker which has to be played at ear-bleeding levels to break up.  There is a proliferation of budget combo's, nearly all having a major weak spot with the speaker.  $105 for the G12H; $89 for the Greenback.  

  5. 1984 Celestion G12T-75.  UK made, from Marshall's JCM800 era, works perfectly, 15/16 ohm.  If  you're restoring an old Marshall, you'll want the right speaker and this one is less than a new Chinese model at $95.  

  6. Celestion G12M-70.  A classic in the Celestion catalog for decades.  8 ohms, nice shape, works perfectly.  $50.  

  7. 1972 CTS 10" 8 ohm Speakers.  Very clean pair of CTS 10's for various Fender amps such as Vibrolux Reverb and Super Reverb, or sounds good in any Fender with a 10".  Original cones in very nice vintage condition.  CTS manufactured in '72, 42nd week (137 7242), manufactured for Fender (064121).  One of these works perfect, the other doesn't meter but there is no scratchiness if you press in the cone so it may not need a recone.  If you need original equipment to restore your valuable vintage Fender amp, here's a nice pair:  $125 for the working speaker, $50 for the one that needs attention, possibly a recone.  

  8. Fender 12" Speaker, from Hot Rod Deluxe, good shape, $39

  9. New Crate 12" Speaker, very good quality replacement speaker, Eminence made, 50W, heavy voice coil, 8 ohms, new in the box and never installed, $35.

  10. Eminence Speaker, 1971, 12”, 8 ohm, correct equipment for some Fenders, Ampegs, and others (please do your research), sounds great, $75.

  11. Fender 12” Speaker, 1987, made by Eminence for Fender, $65

  12. 1975 Fender CTS 12" 16 Ohm, works perfectly, original cone, and original equipment for Bassman 2X12, Musicmaster Bass, and possibly others.  $99.

  13. Line 6 Speaker, from a Flextone 60, 8 ohms, works perfectly, $49

  14. Marshall MG50FX 12" Speakers.  Pair available.  Removed from above pair of MG50FX combo's when new thus mint condition.  $25/each. $45/pair.  

  15. Mesa/Boogie Speakers, pair of 90W Celestion Black Shadows with one needing a recone ($99 for pair) and pair of 50W Vintage Black Shadows (one cone has dimple repairs) ($150 for pair)

  16. Mojotone M121660, 12", 2" voice coil, 20oz magnet, 60 Watt, 8 Ohm, last of my new Mojotone stock, discontinued as Jensen is making their speakers now but Mojo’s were stock in many boutique amps such as Budda back in the day, anyhow, new in the box for $75/each.    

  17. Peavey Blue Marvel 12" speaker, original equipment on Classic 30and many others, works perfectly and a definite upgrade to most Jensen or Eminence for just $39. 

  18. Peavey Scorpion 12" Speakers, one is a regular Scorpion, the other is the heavier Scorpion Plus.  Both 8 ohms.  The Plus has a very small glue spot but works perfectly.  These are excellent speakers and upgrades over cheap Jensens.  $45/ea.  

  19. Soldano 12" Eminence Legend, model V1216, made for a Soldano by Eminence.  16 ohms and designed for a 4X12 cabinet but can also be used in a 2X12 or single 12" if you want to lower the output volume.  Very clean shape, $49.  

  20. Toa 2-way Speaker, dual cone, 8 ohms, rated at around 75W, from KB amp but good for monitor or other amp, $39

  21. Peavey Sheffield Triple XXX Pair, (pic2).  12" guitar speakers, 50 watts (200W Peak, 100W Program, 16 ohms.  USA made and the model used in Peavey's popular JSX (Joe Satriani) series and with their chrome plating, some of the coolest looking speakers ever.   Especially good speakers for harder-edged music; rock or metal.  These sound great in a 4X12 cab or wire them up for an 8 ohm load in your combo or 2X12 cabinet.  A new pair is $160; get this pair for $99(Tent. Hold - 3/24). 

  22. Peavey Blue Marvel 12".  12" guitar speakers, 75 watts (300W Peak, 150W Program, 8 ohms. A popular model in many of Peavey's amps, especially their Classic series.  Especially well voiced for Blues or rock.  In clean cosmetic shape other than a very small ding on the edge that we filled and doesn't present a problem (see arrow in pic).  Sells new for $70; this one's $39. 

  23. Eminence Kappa Pro 15LF, (pic2).  15" low frequency driver, 600 watts (1200W program), 8 ohms.  Quality USA Eminence especially designed with extended Xmax to deliver more bass than standard models and provide 'a true woofer' for 3-way applications.  Engineered to give a clean extended bass response in ported cabinets of approx. 4 cubic ft.).  Ideal speaker for portable high power P.A. and club music systems but can also work in bass guitar amplification.  Sells new for $149 but this one is brand new, never installed, and is just $99.  

ACCESSORIES/PARTS/FOOTSWITCHES:

  1. Fender Amp Footswitch 2-button 1/4", Vibrato and Reverb, stereo 1/4" jack for reissues including Twin, Vibroverb, Deluxe, Custom Vibrolux, Vibrasonic, etc.  Still has factory bands on it.  $35

  2. Fender Amp Footswitch, two button with different colored LED's for use on dark stages, labeled "Channel Select" and "Drive/More Drive".  Uses a stereo cable and you can use this on many amps that use a 2-button footswitch.  2 available at $25/ea

  3. Marshall 2-button footswitch, new, for Marshall amps, $29

  4. Marshall channel selector switch, $29

  5. Marshall footswitch, Marshall #2, new, for Marshall amps, $29/ea

  6. Peavey Footswitches, choice of 2-button or 3-button, both use multi-pin connector, 3-button $29/$25

  7. Randall 2-button footswitch, for Randall amps, new in box, $29

  8. Fender 2-button Footswitch, uses stereo ¼” cable, labeled chorus/channel but should work with channel/boost, led indicators, $25.

  9. Peavey 1-button switch, for channel switching on most amps, $15

  10. Marshall Cover 1X12 JCM Series, new, plastic, for handles on sides, approx 19x19x11, $15

  11. Marshall Cover 1X12 Valvestate, new, plastic, for handle on top, $15

  12. Marshall cover, black with gold writing for 4X12 straight cabs, mint, $29/ea. 

  13. 60's Silvertone 2-button Footswitch, for your Tremolo and Reverb equipped early 60's Silvertone.  All original including cable and plug.  Ebay price on one with a replacement plug is $125 (link), which would make this all-original one very fairly priced at $85.  

  14. Fender Style Oxblood Grill Cloth, (pic2).  A good choice to go with the tweed covering above, Oxblood with Gold Stripe, this roll is 48" X 74".   Sells online for $21.75/square yard.  This roll is over 2.7 yards for just $35.

  15. Tweed Amp Covering.  For you DIY'ers, whether you're restoring an old Fender, or just want to give any amp more of a vintage look.  Excellent quality tweed covering with fabric layer under tweed layer.  64" width sells online for $29 per .6 yard  (1 square yard).  I have a roll that's ^64" and 1.6 yards long (2.9 square yards), almost 3X the size for just $49. 

TUBES:

New Tubes.  (see listings below) I recently came across a small lot (40 or so) of tubes from the final sale of "The Only Guitar Shop", which closed back in '06.  All are brand new in the box.  Shipping cost is $5 for Priority Mail with tracking, regardless of amount ordered. 

  1. Electroharmonix EL34, NOS, matched pair, $25/pair

  2. Sovtek EL84, NOS, matched quartet, Sovtek "7" = warm tone and good definition/clarity, $39/quad

  3. Sovtek EL84, NOS, singles, 3 available, $15/each

  4. Ruby 6550, NOS, matched pairs, 3 pairs available, $55/pair

  5. Svetlana 6550C, NOS, singles, 3 available, the best budget 6550 (or KT88) you can get, smooth, liquid bass, natural sound, and openness, $25/each

  6. Mesa-Boogie 6L6, NOS, STR430, matched pair, $39/pair

  7. Ruby 6L6, NOS, single, STR, $12/ea

  8. Electroharmonix 6L6, NOS, $15/ea

  9. Groove Tubes/Fender 6V6, NOS, matched pairs, hand-slected by GT to be the best, 2 pairs available, $29/pair(HOLD both - Mark S 2/26)

  10. Ruby 6V6, NOS, single, $10

  11. Sovtek 6V6, NOS, single, smoked glass, $20

  12. Sovtek 6L6, NOS, single, smoked glass, $20

  13. Sovtek 6L6, NOS, single, clear glass, 2 available, $20/each

  14. Electroharmonix 6V6, NOS, singles, 3 available, $12 (Hold 1 for Thomas)

  15. Sovtek 5AR4, NOS, single, $10

  16. Ruby 5AR4, NOS, single, $13

  17. Sovtek 12AX7WXT, NOS, single, Sovtek's best, quiet with more gain than the A, WA, or WB models, $8/each (Hold 1 for Thomas)

  18. Sovtek 6SL7, NOS, singles, 2 available, $10/each